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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 8:45 pm 
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Hercules

Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:58 am
Posts: 53
Location: United States of America
The Bible was Put Together by Vote 2001

Quote:
"There has been one reoccurring claim by Christians regarding the bible; I have heard it from nearly every Christian who corresponds with me. It is the statement that the bible-- being a perfect book, written by forty writers all inspired by God-- has remained unchanged for thousands of years. This claim, when made by by a layman, shows his ignorance of the subject, and when made a religious authority, is dishonest and misleading.

The fact that the books of the bible, both the Old and New Testament, have undergone change throughout the centuries, is undeniable. The Dead Sea Scrolls prove this. The Scrolls, dating to about the first century C.E., demonstrate that there were several versions of scripture in distribution-- some that are claimed by scholars to be even more extensive, and of better quality, than those found in our modern bibles.

Most Christians seem to think that the bible (as it is now, with its sixty-six or so books, divided into chapters and verses) has existed for thousands of years. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, the bible that most Christians are familiar with is a fairly recent contrivance. The religious term "canon" refers to the divinity of a specific set of writings. Just which books are canonical and which are not has been the subject of debate among Judeo-Christian leaders for the last two thousand years. The Protestant Church did not agree on which books should be contained in the bible until as late as 1647, at the Assembly of Westminster.

New Testament Books which are now accepted by Christians
, but which were for a time rejected, are:

Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, Revelation.

Books now excluded from the canon, but which are found in some of the older manuscripts of the New Testament, are:

Shepherd of Hermas, Epistle of Barnabas, 1 Clement, 2 Clement, Paul’s Epistle to Laodiceans, Apostolic Constitutions.

Books accepted as canonical by some Jews, and for most part by the Greek and Roman Catholic churches, but rejected by the Protestants, are

Baruch, Tobit, Judith, Book of Wisdom, Song of the Three Children, History of Susanna, Bel and the Dragon, Prayer of Manasseh, Ecclesiasticus, 1 Esdras, 2 Esdras, 1 Maccabees, 2 Maccabees, 3 Maccabees, 4 Maccabees, 5 Maccabees.

The only books of the Bible which are accepted as divine by all Jews and all varieties of Christians are the first five books of the Old Testament: the Pentateuch.

There are lost books of the bible, which should have been included into the canon. These books are cited by writers of the Bible, and they are: Book of the Wars of the Lord, Book of Jasher, Book of the Covenant, Book of Nathan, Book of Gad, Book of Samuel, Prophecy of Ahijah, Visions of Iddo, Acts of Uzziah, Acts of Solomon, Three Thousand Proverbs of Solomon, A Thousand and Five Songs of Solomon, Chronicles of the Kings of Judah, Chronicles of the Kings of Israel, Book of Jehu, Book of Enoch.

What we know as the "canonized" bible was not assembled in anything like it's present form until the 3rd century by a council of bishops (although it was still debated for centuries after). They chose which books should be included in the bible, which books were inspired by God, by vote, just as we might vote on a law. (Can you imagine that some books missed out on being The Word of God by one vote?) Were they any more qualified to judge which books were divine than anyone living today? Is their judgment and knowledge any better than ours?

What ever happened to the Gospels according to Thomas, Jade, James, Peter, and the Gospel of the Hebrews, of the Egyptians, of Perfection, of Judas, of Thaddeus, of the Infancy, of the Preaching of Peter, of the Shepherd of Hermas, the Epistle of Barnabas, the Pastor of Hermas, the Revelation of Peter, the Revelation of Paul, the Epistle of Clement, the Epistle of Ignatius, the Gospel of Mary, the Gospel of Nicodemus and of Marcion? They were all not considered inspired (or inspired enough). They did not get voted in. There were also the Acts of Pilate, of Andrew, of Mary, of Paul and Thecla, and many others. If the bishops at the Council of Laodicea in 365 had voted differently, millions of Christians would have believed differently. The vote of the one is the belief of all the others.

There is one important question for you to consider: why are we bound by their opinion?

What we have come to know as the bible was not in a solid form until the Gutenberg printing press was invented in the 15th century. Before that, the bible was copied by hand, onto scrolls and parchments, which could be easily altered to fit the needs of those in power. It was malleable, easily altered-- no one could hinder the early Church from adding or subtracting verses at their will. No one will ever know just how much of the biblical text was altered, deleted, and rewritten while it was in handwritten form."


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 8:00 pm 
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Hercules

Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:58 am
Posts: 53
Location: United States of America
Quote:
The Protestant Church did not agree on which books should be contained in the bible until as late as 1647, at the Assembly of Westminster.


I think I am missing something here. If the purpose of the Westminster Assembly was to decide on what books are to be in the Bible and the Assembly took place around 1647, why was the King James Version published in 1611? That is a 36 year difference. :?:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 2:52 am 
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Moderator

Joined: Sun Sep 05, 2010 11:45 am
Posts: 550
Well the original version of the King James Translation did have the Catholic "apocrypha" books in it.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 11:43 am 
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Hercules

Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:58 am
Posts: 53
Location: United States of America
GodAlmighty wrote:
Well the original version of the King James Translation did have the Catholic "apocrypha" books in it.


Biblical Apocrypha

After the Lutheran and Catholic canons were defined by Martin Luther (c. 1534) and Trent (April 8, 1546) respectively, early Protestant editions of the Bible (notably the Luther Bible in German and 1611 King James Version in English) did not omit these books, but placed them in a separate Apocrypha section apart from the Old and New Testaments to indicate their status. The 1647 Westminster Confession of Faith during the English Civil War (1642–1651) specifically excluded the Apocrypha, thus Bibles printed by English Protestants who separated from the Church of England began to exclude these books.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 3:47 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 05, 2010 11:45 am
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And there you go. Sounds like 1611 fell in a time when the canon was still under question (hence still including, but sectioning off, the Catholic books) and then in 1647 the question was finally settled.


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