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PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2010 1:32 pm 
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In a thread on Facebook the question was raised of whether or not the biblical word "Amen" is related to or reflective of the Egyptian god Amen, Amun, Amon or Ammon. In defense of the Bible, which one poster has claimed as "true," another Christian has stated:

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Amen used in Christian worship comes not from Egyptian, but from Hebrew. It is derived from three Hebrew consonants: aleph (’), mem (m), and nun (n). The basic idea of the root mn is firmness or certainty. Mn denotes something that is sure and unchanging. From it comes the verb aman which means to make something sure or established. Amen is the adverb form with the same meaning. Sometimes it is translated verily or surely in the Bible. Often this word is not translated but simply transliterated in the Greek. This means that the meaning is not given, but the letters are simply changed from Hebrew into Greek characters.

The Egyptian idol Amen-Ra had quite a different origin and meaning. At first, Amen was known in Egypt as a local god or spirit who controlled the wind. The name means that which is unseen (as the wind is unseen).

In contrast, the English word Amen comes to us from the Hebrew and emphasizes the faithfulness and dependability of God the Creator. It is used sometimes as a title of Jesus Christ celebrating His faithfulness, as in Revelation 3:14 in the Bible: These things says the Amen, the faithful and true witness.

It was used by Jesus to emphasize the absolute dependability of His words. In this case the Hebrew word Amen is translated verily or truly. The best known example of this usage is found in John 3:3 in the Bible: Verily, verily, I say unto you, you must be born again. But the most common usage of the word is as a response or conclusion to something stated.

The Hebrew word and the use of the term Amen amongst Jews and Christians is far removed from the meaning of the Egyptian idol Amen and implies no allegiance to him or recognition of him. To the contrary, Amen means that the speaker is acknowledging the faithfulness of the One Supreme Creator God who speaks and acts with authority, and who is always able to bring His word to pass.

The Egyptian idol Amen is compared with the wind. He’s not only unseen, he’s also unsteady and undependable. It’s the exact opposite picture that the Amen of our wonderful Creator God presents. The One True and Living God is steadfast, sure, and immovable.

To that I am not ashamed to say AMEN! AND AMEN!

Firstly, I am well aware of the standard etymology of the word "Amen," but I find it to be lacking in the same manner as so many other religiously held "facts."

Secondly, to say that "the Bible is true" requires a virtually total ignorance of all other cultures of the time and place, including the Egyptian, which was in reality highly influential on several cultures recorded in the Bible. These Egyptian-influenced cultures unquestionably included the Israelitish, Jewish or Hebrew one.

In this regard, let us look at the word אמן or "amen" (Strong's H543), which appears 78 times in the King James Bible but only a total of 30 times in the original Hebrew text. Amen is translated in Strong's as "verily, truly, amen, so be it."

However, Jeremiah 46:25 and Nahum 3:8 contain clear references to the god Amen or Amon (Strong's H528), using the Hebrew word אמון, which is not much different from the word אמן, missing only the letter ו. Since it is so obviously not much of a difference, the readers of the original Hebrew may well have associated the two words. Certainly, these references in Jeremiah and Nahum prove that the Jewish priests who wrote the Bible were well aware of this Egyptian god, as were the later translators of the Greek Bible, the Septuagint, who rendered the word in Nahum 3:8 as Αμων - Amon.

As concerns the Hebrew, Strong's defines the word אמון as:

"Amon or Amun = 'to nourish: to be faithful'

"1) an Egyptian god, originally the local god of Thebes, later head of the Egyptian pantheon"

Since "amen" (אמן) is also defined by Gesenius's Lexicon as "faithful," it is obvious the two words are related - and that the Jewish priests were also well aware of this connection between Amen and Amon.

The relationship of the words is also obvious from the fact that the Hebrew "amen" is rendered in the Septuagint (LXX) as γένοιτο or "genoito," meaning "let it become," along with the apparently related word אמר or "amar" meaning "to speak." This correspondence becomes clear when we know that in an Egyptian text the god Amen/Amon is described as "the one who speaks and what should come into being came into being." (Greenberg, 101 Myths of the Bible, 13)

In addition, as I write in Suns of God (122):

Quote:
...the scripture at Isaiah 65:16 reads, "Elohim Amen," i.e., the God(s) Amen or Ammon. In the Vulgate or Latin translation of the Bible made by Jerome in 405 CE, the phrase is "in Deo amen."... While "amen" appears as an adverb or emphatic 281 in the New Testament, the ruse is revealed at Revelation 3:14, where the scripture states: "...The words of the Amen, the faithful and true witness..." "The Amen" is not an adverb, i.e., "verily, truly," but a noun, referring to the God Amen/Amon/Ammon, who is interpreted in this passage as "Jesus Christ." "Amen" is apparently one of the "magic words" or ineffable names of God within the mysteries, as it is in reality the name of a very powerful, widespread and old Egyptian god: To wit, Ammon/Amon/Amen, the "chief deity of Egypt [who] must be accepted as the sun..." Hence, per the New Testament itself, Jesus Christ is Amen, the God Sun.

In this same regard, the original Greek of 2 Corinthians 1:20 also names Jesus as τὸ Ἀμὴν - the Amen.

As we can see, there is much more to the story than meets the eye.

To assume that Judaism was created in a vacuum completely uninfluenced by its neighboring religions and cults is an unsustainable, "blind" belief.

The Bible has certainly not been proved to be "true." On the contrary, numerous aspects of it have been demonstrated to be false, fictional and mythical, the latter term meant not as dismissive but as reflecting ancient pre-Judaic and pre-Christian mythology. The only reason most people believe the Bible is "true" is because they been taught to believe as much, likely since childhood.

Moreover, there is no good reason to suppose that the Egyptians did not possess every possible concept concerning "God" and that their gods were in any way inferior to the Jewish tribal god Yahweh. Indeed, as I demonstrate in Christ in Egypt, the Egyptians certainly did possess as cosmic a concept of divinity as can be found in the Bible - more so, in reality. The disparagement of the Egyptian gods is a reflection of cultural conditioning and bigotry, essentially saying, "My God is bigger and better than yours." Obviously, such a contention is not a scientific endeavor but an exercise in ego.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2010 7:54 pm 
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I thought it mean Amen-Ra, not verily. :lol:

Thanks for that post, Acharya.

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Nonviolence is the greatest force at the disposal of mankind. It is mightier than the mightiest weapon of destruction devised by the ingenuity of man. ~ Gandhi

Non-violence leads to the highest ethics, which is the goal of all evolution. Until we stop harming all other living beings, we are still savages. ~ Thomas A. Edison


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:49 am 
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I had always wondered why many words found in the Bible were parallel with Egyptian names and words. I can't think of others at the moment but I've read many sections of the bible that had me wondering.

Thanks for this informative post!


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 2:14 am 
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Here is some more on this subject, in response to this question again about whether or not the "Amen" of the Bible was originally a reference to the Egyptian god.

The theory is that "Amen" is the Egyptian god Amun/Amen. He is included in the Bible whenever "God" (Yahweh, El, Elohim, Adonai) is said to be "hidden." Amun is the "hidden god."

Isaiah 65:16 refers to "Elohim Amen" אלהי אמן, rendered "God of truth" (LXX τὸν θεὸν τὸν ἀληθινόν). This is the same word "Amen" said to be "verily," etc., at the end of Bible verses.

http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lex ... H543&t=RSV

In his Latin translation, Jerome renders the phrase Deo amen, which essentially means "God Amen."

http://www.blueletterbible.org/Bible.cf ... les_744016

See my book Suns of God for more info:

http://books.google.com/books?id=rey19p ... en&f=false

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:36 pm 
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What's funny is that this Egyptian God known as the hidden one is "hidden" at the beginning and end of so many Bible verses. Hidden in plain view as it were...

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The Jesus Mythicist Creed:
The "Jesus Christ" of the New Testament is a fictional composite of characters, real and mythical. A composite of multiple "people" is no one.

The celestial Origins of Religious Belief
ZG Part 1
Jesus: Hebrew Human or Mythical Messiah?


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