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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:45 am 
Thanks to a few inspirational freethinking scholars, most notably Acharya, I have finished my monograph "The Inherent Scholarly Prejudices on the Relationship between Judaism, Buddhism, and Christianity—or—Jesus’s Godama Sources and a Truer History of the Post-Axial Age Egyptian, Grecian, and Persian Empires". The following paper is partly based on my monograph. Readers may find it to be a difficult read. For some reason my footnotes could not be copied directly so I will post them later.


Psamtik III, or “KING TUT”(Sans. Zhisunaga), Tu-te-nk-amun, son of Amasis II (Vidudabha), from Gy-naeco-polis , the Sy-nago-gue of the Buddhist Su-naga, or, Se-snag sa-ngha, Shi-su-naga , jJa-nakra, or Ja-ncy-rus, or Ja-naka, the Teu-to-nic Te-nages, Cha-nakya, Ja-ya-naga, TaoTe-Chi-ng or Ta-tha-naga , E-NOCH, SA-NKHA (CO-NCH symbol for world rule), Egyptian SO-NCHIS, Se-th-ankh, or Se-th-nakh-t, Sancho, EU-NUCH, African CO-NGO {Ta-ngayika, or Sha-nique or Ka-nishka (who may have brought Iron there) Sho-she-nq, Sheshanaag, Tri-sha-nku, Hiuen T-sia-ng, the Mexican Zihua-ta-nejo (Shaw-sha-nk of America,) Shishak, or, Shi-sha-nk, a.k.a. Mahapadma-nanda—“ki-ng”= “si-ngh”= “su-naga ”. The Seneka, or Sunaga, that formed the Sank-script which helped form the sanctus scriptum







Amasis II married Hitta (Budd. Khitta) the daughter of Battus (Polycrates Budd. ring/daughter, Pharaoh gives Joseph, or Bosat, his seal ring [Gen. XLI. 42]). Battus was said to be the Libyan king of the Phut-ites who was looking for a warrior hero when a ship arrived with warriors with shinning shields of gold . Soon, by assassination, Amasis II would take the throne of Egypt and soon after followed in Egypt, the Buddhist pink Lotus’ so difficult to sustain in the Nile, the Buddhist staff, the Ankh (Sans. Ankusaka), the hook used by poor Indian sudras to “reap the fruit”, the cobra-hood (naga-phana) worn by Vidudabha as portrayed in his legend as Sindbad (Hind-Budh) which probably first appeared in Egypt Buto for Amasis and his son Tutankh-amun (“King Tut”, Psammenitus, or Zhizunaga, the Buddhist child king). That Amasis’ doctor and advisor was Pythagoras is supported by Herodotus who says Amasis compelled a doctor to treat the Persian king and this agrees with the forced servitude and the alleged travels of Pythagoras. Anyone who has read the Buddhist texts and Herodotus’ account of the clever tomb robber will not fail to see the Buddhist Mahacora (Mercury) and will have an understanding of how this Jewel pertains to the Buddhist naga-jewel and the Buddhist/Egyptian/Greek Oriental Black and White Gyps vulture that savages the dead (systems).
Herodotus says that Polycrates was advised by Amasis to throw away his most valuable possession in order to further his string of good fortune. Herodotus says that he did so when he threw his emerald signet-ring into the sea. The ring was said to be swallowed by a fish, which represents the Buddhist Makara, only to be caught by a poor fishermen who, recognizing such a find should rightly be brought to the king. That this ring is the Buddhist signet ring, the serpent-ring, or sunaga, is evident because, in Buddhism, the sunaga-ring represented the succession of the Dharma-king, like Vidudabha, who is also called Janaka (Sunaga), as being the son of a mixed race (Misara). It obviously represented the women’s (gynaika = sunaga) acceptance into religious orders and signified the beginning of the end to patriarchal (cynical = dog-like, known in Egyptian allegory and the practice of the Matriarchal Scythians helped the Buddhist convert them) systems.
Amasis’ Greek wife was Ladice, or Lotus , and its seems evident that the Homeric hymn to Apollo, which first appears in Polycrates island of Samos under the pen of a certain Cynaethus (Ssunagas) , was composed for such occasion. In this hymn we have the tree bending down for Leto, or Lotus (Ladice ), which cannot be doubted, was first an Indian and Buddhist motif which would later appear in other faiths which could owe nothing to this single hymn, or sing (sunag). When Amasis married Ladice it seemed to make a big commotion and their Cinderella (Sans. candela = of sudra birth, like Amasis and all the Buddhist kings of this time. Amasis’, or Sunaga’s legend being preserved in the Konigs-novelle (or Sunaga’s story) and in the legend of Sinuhe, the name of Vidudabha’s great grandfather Sihahanu) story was known in both the west and with the Buddhist sangha (sunaga).
This Amasis was born as Vidudabha, like the Buddha, he was pampered to the utmost and by his father. But Vidudabha killed his father to assume his kingdom and soon after murdered all the Shakyas that would not apologize for disrespecting him by accusations of ignoble birth.
Jancyrus , who led the Budians, was the king who we are told would not submit to Darius I’s request to mary the Scythian queen (Marry was a word for Buddhist marriage before it was name). This appears to be Cyrus the Great and Darius I would spend the next four or five decades trying to expel the new religion which was based on the Buddhist slave revolt.


By the time Darius I would catch up with Jancyrus, or Amasis, he was said to have already died. Other accounts mention that Amasis was taken prisoner to Susa and forced to watch his son and a beggar being put to death. When asked about how he felt he replied that he felt terrible for the beggar, a response we would expect from a Buddhist king as Buddha himself says he was descended from kings of old who were “beggars” (some Caesars also made a show of begging). When Jancyrus was said to battle with Darius, who I have taken to be Cyrus, it is said that Darius sent slaves recklessly attacking the Scythian lines. Jancyrus , who appears to have drawn Darius deep into Scythia, instead of attacking the slaves with weapons of war, used whips on them as had been formerly used on them. This was obviously a Buddhist tactic and it was said to have been successful in some degree as Darius was said to barely escape with his life, which probably means that Darius was Cyrus the Great, who Amoraeus, “the Mauryan”, or Vidudabha, killed.
Polyaenus calls Amasis of Maraphii "Arsames" and evidence suggests that the Arsames, or, Artames, where to protect tame, or dharma, via. force (ar). This Amasis who was said to be from the Mesabatae (Megabates/Mahabad/Mahabodhi ) seems to be Amasis II. Like those in the Sanchoniatho who take the names of their mothers, the Arsames are said to draw there lineage from a certain queen Qanju ([of] Sunaga).
The war which expelled Vidudabha (Janaka) from his Kosala kingdom started with a minor comment by a common person. This is similar to the circumstances which led Alexander to unjustly slaughter those of Persepolis. Although Vidudabha was justifiably enraged at being treated like a slave, while Alexander’s drunken tantrum was based on the acts of those who lived in a prior generation.
The Moon, or Amasis, eclipsed the sun, or Buddha, on 559 B.C. This may have been when Amasis became king of Egypt and probably about the same time Buddha appeared to pass away. The sun was said to be darkened at Jesus passing also.
The idea that Buddhists would engineer mixed marriages has its certain parallels with the underlining theme to the popular Greek play “The Birds”, which Megasthenes claimed was originally an Indian creation. Of course he was correct, as the Buddha’s dream in the Sanghabhedavastu about the many different birds becoming one color (Thus Comes One, from many one & Jesus making all the rags the same color in Gospel Thomas), the well known Voice-Chrarmer Jataka about the Bodhisattva as the leader of birds who escapes the hunter’s net by first working together to ‘fly-up’, and, when they get caught again, they fake dead, all the mythical Buddhist birds with their Egyptian, Grecian, Persian, Chinese, counterparts, etc., are all well known in Buddhist works and in “sync” with the earliest of Buddhism.
Cyrus the Great was thought to have sought advice on how to handle the Messagetae from a certain Croesus who introduces Cyrus (Sans. Kurus) to the Buddhist wheel of fortune saying the following, “But if thou feelest thyself to be a man, and a ruler of men, lay this first to heart, that there is a wheel on which the affairs of men revolve, and that its movement forbids the same man to be always fortunate." -The history of Herodotus, p. 278
Plutarch in his Life of Numa writes about the custom of circling things as a gesture of honor. Trying to explain this custom, he says: "Perhaps this change of posture may have an enigmatical meaning, like the Egyptian wheels, admonishing us of the instability of everything human, and preparing us to acquiesce and rest satisfied with whatever turns and changes the Divine Being allots us." This, without doubt, was a Buddhist custom taken to Egypt and Europe after it rolled through Asia. The Egyptian Sed festival features the Indian wolf that is an ancestor to our dog. Amasis’ crew probably brought this wolf to (Gothic hero, Indian lion) the Naucratis, with the Himalayan sheep, or the Ovis longipes palaeo-aegyptiacus, Jason was said to search for the fleece of this animal in the Himalayas. The horns of this sheep were mimicked by Alexander probably as a sign of the Buddha’s curly hair. The Buddhist conch (sankha, fr. sunaga), and the curls of the African Bundo, the Indian Bondo (Munda), are also said to “spiral to the right”, which may be a reference to the Buddha as the sun. The Bundo, or, Nak, peoples of Africa and India are represented on Asoka’s art as having received portions of his relics. The Sed festival is believed to have been introduced in order to stop the practice of priests killing the king when they thought he could not govern anymore. The oriental saying, or creed, “long live the king” was probably not that popular with the Egyptian priests under Amasis. It was probably very proverbial after the rule of Ptolemy Philadelphus who more than likely helped the Ethiopian king Ergamenes kill all his priests for attempting to continue the tradition of killing kings when they believed they couldn’t govern, or, as any reasonable person may suppose, if they just wanted them gone. Whatever the case, it is hard to believe that such an Ethiopian practice continued for around a thousand years while a similar, if not the exact same tradition, in Egypt was abolished.
If historians get past the chronology of Egypt, and the resulting errors caused by this corrupt counting, besides many figures falling into their correct time, they may notice that the continent of Africa has imported many ancient Bodhi trees (the pipal, or, “people-trees”), they have their own mount. Meru, their own circulating Jatakas which have little relation to the Buddhist works introduced to Egypt, such as the Tale of Two Brothers and the legend of Sinuhe. The so called Tar-baby story is found everywhere in Africa, except, possibly, in Egypt,
The Tar-baby story, which, unless the Native American Tar-wolf versions influence the African version, which was highly unlikely, traveled with slaves to America. One African version was found in Cape Verde Islands grouped with thief tales that include a tale very close to that of Herodotus’ “history” of Rhampsinitus. What Herodotus says about Rhampsinitus giving his daughter to the master thief comes very close to an incident in the Mulasarvastivadin vinaya. In the Mulasarvastavasin version Mahacora (Mercury ), to capture the king’s daughter who was on a boat in the middle of the river, knocks into the water many pots from a riverside store, only to allude the king’s guards after they became tired of smashing the pots when he slipped under one, made it on board, and impregnated the princess. In the end the king also makes the thief as his only son. There are several Buddhist sources to the African Tar-baby fable. In the Samyutta Nikaya we read of a hunter that would trap foolish monkeys by lacing their path with tar. When a monkey would get one hand stuck in the tar, they would get their second hand stuck trying to free the first. At five points the monkey would become stuck and this is where the story ended. In a Jataka which is dated to much later, which is not to suggest that it was not an ancient fable, the Bodhisattva becomes stuck to a sticky org in the same way which the monkey was stuck to the tar. This last version is the one which shares complex parallels with what is essentially the African and African-American versions and it usually is based around the hero trying to obtain an object which is not considered his, but which he finally obtains. By this, it may be theorized that a parable, or, Buddha’s illustration of getting stuck at five-points, i.e. being stuck in ones senses, changed to suit the needs of those in need of hope and fearlessness; all of the later versions seem to have been constructed for the purpose of imparting a sort of relentless tenaciousness.
Like with the general reader, there is little doubt that any reputable scholar would deny most of the assertions above. There is also little doubt that some European, African, and Central Asian nationalistic scholars, only to name a few, may see, in my thesis, a grain of what they take to be the real truth and argue that I have wrongly attributed this influence to the Buddhists of India and that their particular country was the true seat of the type of influence claimed above. However, they must recognize that, besides many ancient testimonies about Buddhist missionaries sent to far-off lands (even their own claims), the Buddhists were the only ones to directly associate Sunaga, or Shisunaga (Tutank-amun) with marriages not based on race, caste or nationality, and around those ancient places bearing the name Shisunaga there are traces of very ancient systems instituting very liberal reforms that were in sync (sunaga) with the earliest Buddhism that flourished around Northern India. That said, because the research into African and non-aryan Indian languages and the studies of their oral and literary traditions have been utterly lacking, more research may find a great Egyptian or African textual tradition on which the world’s largest biography, that of Siddhartha Godama, was based. In "Jesus’s Godama Sources" I try to deal with the obstacles to finding such a connection and mention is made here that the Blemmyae of Africa are named in what is believed to be one of the earliest Buddhist vinaya texts. It is noted that people from from Australia to Europe have claimed the Buddha as one of their own ancient blood relatives. If such a person existed, inasmuch as there is such an absolute classification as race, they all may be correct based on the mere circumstance that Buddha Godama, or the cult under his name, appears in a racially diverse setting and in that location and pivotal time of the ancient world which could rightly be called a “middle-point” to many of earths largest civilizations.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:46 am 
The Sanskrit SU- meaning “excellent”, carrying with it a sense of “beauty”. The Buddhist naga, according to my reading of the Buddhist texts, is meant to represent real powerful people who are said to have, in many previous existences, vowed to be the dispersers and protectors of Buddhism. As far as the social status of those who took the name Naga, although Buddhist Brahmins like Sariputra were called “Great Naga”, they seem to have been mostly sudras and dasas.
SENAKA {Sunaga}: An ancient grammarian referred to by Panini
The original Greeks, or Grha-ikas, from the Chaityagrihas, where no other than Amasis and his people who were the original Hellenes, the Buddhist Theravadin, or, therapeutae, kulas who established Gynaeco-polis (city of Sunaga), who are place 600 years before their time. This holds true for the first Ptolemy, Haxamanis, Alaksandu, etc.., the Egyptian king at this remote time was painted as Ptah’s restorer. The careful reader will note that the earliest Buddhist texts group the Scythians with the Greeks, or Yavanas, those “YE”, or “JUS”, the “just”, ‘yajus/ious’n-ians’ formulators, whose charge it was to institute humankinds return to Eden. Patanjali gives us ‘saka-yavanam’ as a synonym for ‘sudranam’, which means ‘slave-like” or “downgraded social status”, a meaning that is hard to understand when applied to the later Indo-Greeks. The Harivansha-Purana states that the Yavanas as well as the Kambojas shaved their heads, which cannot be the Greek, or Ionians which we have come to know. As seen from his bio, as with the bio of Joseph, Moses, the “lion” spoken of by Egyptians and Jesus, Shesonk, etc.. Amasis II was the first Amasis. His doctor may have been Pythagoras who advised Amasis to stay away from beans. Sanskrit ‘amasa’/ also ‘a mleccha’ or ‘Misr’ As Amasis was called “Melek” (Mleccha) by the Egyptians, and as Melchizedak’s (Melek-Zedekiah; Sans. Sadhika, ‘full’) bio parallels that of Amasis, as with other mythological figures, such as Polybus, they are probably the same person or connected very closely. The same can be said for many other figures, such as, Gobrys (Kubera) the Gutium, who was Godama’s Gothic representative, Astyages, Immanuel, and Darius the Mede, who was forced to throw Daniel into the lion’s den as Asoka tricked his brother into sitting on the throne thereby receiving a death sentence. Amasis was most known in Buddhist circles as Vidudabha but his name was also Sunaga or Janaka and the Upanisads call him Janaka king of Vedhi, or Vidu who appears to me may be the Jancyrus (Janaka, or Sunaga;) who was said to battle Darius’ massive army. From my reading of the Septuagint Isaiah it seems as the author mentions Jancyrus people as the Sogdians and Bactrians who sought to overthrow Babylon. Whatever the case, it also seems that some independent accounts place Jancyrus (said to be a Scythian, or Alan, or, Aryan king) as an instigator, even, when retreating, he was said to have burned all the Saka towns who wouldn’t support his war with Darius, which means that he was probably not welcomed in Scythia. From here, his appears off the coast of North Africa with booty looted from the general area of Thrace.
Major port of Libya was Susu, named after Sheshonk, or Shisunaga.
Amasis’ (Vidudabha) path from India to Egypt may have been almost the opposite track Alexander took to India. The moves of the Biblical Shishank mirrors those of Amasis and there seems to be overlapping legends impressed on Rameses III, or Siptah, and Menes. The antiquity of Egypt, as with the other great empires, has been greatly exaggerated, a fact noticed by many reasonable writers.

“ the kingdom of Judah with a powerful army, in support of his ally. According to 2 Chronicles 12:3, he was supported by the Lubim (Libyans), the Sukkiim, and the Kushites" ("Ethiopians" in the Septuagint). According to the biblical story Shishak carried off many of the treasures of the temple and the royal palace in Jerusalem, including the "shields of gold" that Solomon had made.
"The Nagaraja detaining him, spake;"Of thy kindness go not away. Do thou occupy a neighboring abode; I will prevail to make thee master of this land and obtain for thee lasting fame. All the people shall be thy servants, and thy dynasty shall endure for successive ages" Indian Serpent Lore Or the Nagas in Hindu Legend, p. 124 (What Psamtik said to Amasis, who may have been a Persian general who, with Megabates, or Mahabodhi, the representative of the Persian Mahabada, assisted the Ionians). Amasis [II] was also said to marry a daughter of the priest of “Ptah”. This Khitta was said to father a child by an unnamed king. The child was named Khnum-ib-re (the Brahmin Hun) and it is believed that Cambyses cut him up like Osiris. Amasis may have been recruited by the Egyptians to assassinate the king of Egypt Apries. (Ospreys) who was said, by Herodotus, to have been strangled. Khnum is also the Hun name to the town bear Kabul where a certain Clearchus left inscriptions which claim to be copied from the maxims at Delphi, yet, I give the parallel maxim in my monograph and investigate why Alexander the Great was mistaken for Asoka by Clearchus of Soli, the same Clearchus who claimed the Jews were Syrians who received their doctrine from the Indians.
"The Sakya youth, receiving the Naga's directions, went forth with to make his offering to the king of Udana. When the king was about to take the piece of white camlet, the youth took hold of his sleeve, and pierced him with his sword." Indian Serpent Lore, p. 124 compared to Apries)..
This ring appears in other Indian works also and has its parallels with the magical wring of Gyges. The emerald of Polycrates ring was probably mined near Bernike where Indians settlers are known to have settled.
The Greek Lethe, i.e. the Buddhist lotus, the river of forgetfulness being Buddhist allegory for ‘bodhi’, i.e. trying to wake via. vigil.
Cynaethus = Ssunagas, as naga = snake, the Egyptian N glyph; snaghim = snahhan; the double N was taken from the Buddhist number 8, what is called the 8 of Asoka’s Brahmi script. This Buddhist symbol, which is also the Buddhist and Christian double fish symbol, is our $ sign; variations of it, with discreet Buddhist marks, are found on coins spanning the globe. It is also a great shame that the Brahmi numerals, and the antiquity of their origins and the scope of their influence, have been greatly underestimated.
Lotus, from the Buddhist Ladhaka representatives who were also in Rhodes (rhodus = lotus). Scholars have not supposed the Huns and Buddhists dwelt together in Ladakha 500 B.C. and only a summary view of the map and the Buddhist texts will state otherwise. The roses from the Island of Rhodes are very sacred Buddhist roses found in Central Asia and in China where they also represent the World Tree. It is supposed that Buddhist monks from China brought this rose to the Americas around the year 500. The Buddhist in Ladakha where at Lake Manasarova (Manasa), or “mind-lake” (maya, or Mother, or, Matter Lake) and at Mount Kailasa (Grk. Hella, Budd khala, or kula), where Tha-raja (Troy) Vidudabha acquired the Buddha wheel of world rule.) While Maya’s family can be traced to Anjan Persia, some Buddhist believed that it was here that she was born.
There is a reoccurring Buddhist theme that certain sins are unforgivable, i.e. causing a schism, the murder of a parent, etc.., yet there is also the reoccurring theme that, although the Buddhist initiate may have killed their father, they still may achieve absolute tranquility.
If in fact a real person, Jancyrus may have been Indathyrsus. Jancyrus is made to say that his gods are Jupitar (Go-Buddha, Gupta, Coptos) and Vesta (Queen from home Lhasa; Maya, the Persian and Greek Maia). Buddhist scholars seem to have missed grouping Sunaga, Janaka, and Vidudabha under one person. "Beyond is the story of Nanda [a.k.a. Mahanama, Vidudabha’s grandfather], the Buddha's half-brother, who resisted-or tried to resist-renouncing his wife and his privileged world. Then, on the adjoining left wall, on either side of the pilaster, we find the Jataka tale of the self-sacrificing naga king SANKHA-pala (Sunaga-pala); he is seen both in his splendid theriomorphic (serpent) form and also, below at the left, in his human guise. The whole central portion of the left wall depicts the hataka of King Janaka, a prince very much like Siddhartha who, after innumerable births is destined to become the Buddha. Janaka is shown in the midst of the lavish pleasures and powers that he renounced as he is preparing to move, through both his inner and his outer actions, toward ultimate enlightenment. But here he is still enmeshed in the sensuous-indeed sensual-world, an exuberant world which, "affording enjoyment of well-known comforts in all seasons", is too irresistible to easily leave. Janaka's desire to stay in the midst of those comforts, and his desire to leave them for a deeper search, poses the very dilemma which face the young prince Siddhartha, and which is described by the poet/sage Asvaghosa in his moving Buddhacarita (Life of the Buddha)." Ajanta: Cave by cave, By Walter M. Spink, p. 30
Western sources state that Amasis was from Sais Egypt (Sans TAU cross, as the ankh), the western representative of Susa Persia, from where I believe Maya’s father was a ruler of. It is also noted that the root ‘sasa’ formed many words which have esoteric Buddhist meanings, such as the “lotus”, “hare”, “moon”, “youth”, the Syrian Butomus flower, all of which are associated with the birth, or a marking point, of a new age and the last Buddha’s footprint (where the sangha went). In my book I show that the etymology of Butomus cannot derive from roots forming the phrase ‘cut {from] bull 9{teeth} as an animal that size probably wouldn’t graze on a grass that grew in such deep water. Luke uses two different versions of the name Susa which must mean that the parable he delivers after mentioning Jesus acquired two disciples named “Lotus”, was based on the identical Buddhist parable found in many texts, such as the Lotus sutra. The obscure version of ‘susa’ used by Luke as ‘gyne-chuza’, the wife of ‘chuza’, which could be reversed as “Chuzagnaikas”, or Shisunagas.
At times, Jancyrus appears to be the same as Indathyrsus, who, like Vidudabha (Jancyrus), was said to have murdered his brother Jeta (Ajatasatru, or Salmoxis, “liberated at the sal tree”, who’s doctor was probably Pythagoras, or Jivika, as Herodotus mentions the Scythian Getae belief that the soul migrates; see Bata and Anubis parallels in Jesus’s Godama Sources). That the Scythians (Jancyrus/ Amasis/Vidudabha/Sunaga, etc.) made it to Egypt unharmed is confirmed by Justin (Just. ii 3). Justin also agreed with the Buddhist texts on Chandragupta’s candala birth and his unsuccessful attempt at Palibothra, his retreat, and his final success at seizing ruler of the Magadha Empire.
Megabates, according to an unnamed source, after sabotaging a Persian attack, retired to the Sea of Asov, or Bosat, becoming a petty king or chief pirate. It appears that Alexander the Great may have paid tribute to the relatives of Megabates on his way to India.
The several oral appearances of the Native American version, as well as their other Buddhist Jatakas, such as their version of the Buddhist moon-hare fable, suggest that both the African and American versions sprung from different intermediate sources.
Mercury, or Mahacora, was first a clever thief and his legend was spread, like the earliest of Buddhism, with the help of traders. The idea that the Bodhisattva can be a thief as an end achieving a greater good is believed to be a Mahayana concept. While there can be no doubt that the early Buddhists of all sects taught that stealing was a great sin, their metaphor of the bee taking nectar without damaging flowers, their pipal and udumbara tree being admittedly parasitic, there ever so subtly tactic of misleading, or, averting, questioners, their redefining Brahmic language by etymologizing etc, suggest that there was a Buddhist figure such as Mahacora around 500 B.C

The authors of the Sanchoniathon, the original western demythologizers, give us an allusion to the naga, the pipal tree and Buddhism's parasitic qualites under the desription of the snake that sheds it skin, like the Pheonix, the Egyptian Bennu, the Buddhist Bhanaka, once it has destroyed the gods/God, it self-destructs


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:26 am 
The Date of Menes, and the date of Buddha—by Ernest de Bunsen.

In mentioning the systematic alteration of Hebrew dates in the Septuagint, the author pointed out that the suggested explanation by desire to harmonize Egyptian with Hebrew chronology was non-proven and too vague. The author was of opinion that the date B.C. 4620 was assigned in the Greek version to the creation of the first man, because the Seventy knew on the authority of their great contemporary, Manetho, that the first King of Egypt, Menes, ascended the throne at that date. Herodotus states that he was shown a manuscript from which were read to him by the priests the names of 330 monarchs who had, it was stated, succeeded Menes on the throne, the last of whom Herodotus calls Moeris [Mauryas]. This cannot have been the king after whom Lake Moeris was called. Diodorus states that the Moeris or Morros of Herodotus was called Mendes. The author was of opinion that this may have been Smendes, the first Pharaoh of the XXIst Dynasty, whose accession took place according to the proposed scheme of comparative chronology in B.C. 1065. The reigns of the 330 successors of Menes seem to have filled up Manethonian period of 3,555 years which commenced with Menes; if so, the accession of the first king in Egyptian history, followed by the 330 Pharaohs of Herodotus, was by Manetho believed to have taken place in 4620.

Special reasons were given why the accession of Smendes was regarded as an epoch in Egyptian history, and it was therefore considered to be highly probable that the 330 Pharaohs from Menes to Moeris or Mendes, reached to Smendes; and this probability was taken to be increased by the fact that by reckoning backwards from the author's date of the ascension of Smendes, B.C. 1065, the 3,555 years transmitted by Manetho, we arrive at the date 4620, which the Seventy, contemporaries of Manetho, have connected with the creation of the first man.

The other differences in dates in the Septuagint were considered, and it was stated that all post-diluvian dates had been arrived at by starting from the year B.C. 473. It was contended, and arguments brought to prove, that although this date was an impossible one for the laying of the foundation of the Temple by Solomon, it was a possible one for the birth of Gautama-Buddha.”




"Man has practiced the arts of imposture from so remote an epoch, he has been so ingenious in perverting the truth, that no safe reliance can be placed upon anything that he has directly affirmed or written with reference to antiquity. History is not to be gleaned from the memorials which have been preserved, but rather from those which have been lost, neglected, or forgotten. Man, when viewed generally, is a constitutional romancer, one who is altogether too cunning to be convicted out of his own mouth." The Worship of Augustus Caesar, p. 3


"The Rev. Dr. Greswell, who examined them with great care, long since pronounced a verdict which every fresh archaeological discovery has only tended to confirm; they are utterly false and unreliable. In the effort to exaggerate their own antiquity and to conceal their racial origin, the Egyptians invented hundreds of imaginary gods and kings, whose fabulous exploits they commemorated in epigraphs of a long subsequent age."



"Therefore the classical Saturn must inevitable be identified with the Ila or Buddha or Menu of the Indo-Scythae. Agreeably to this conclusion, we find him, in the Phenician mythology, immediately connected with Taut or Thoth: for he is said to have extended his sovereignty to the south over Egypt, and to have given the sceptre of that country to Taut {Amasis II}. The legend itself, if historically considered, relates no doubt to the conquest of Egypt by the Phenician or Cuthic Shepherd-kings : but these were professed worshippers of Taut or Buddha: and, however Sanchoniatho [Sunaga-nattha] in a manner very common among the old mythologists may have divided his national god into the two characters of Il and Taut, they were in reality one and the same person, whose rites were brought by the Scythian Shepherds from upper India to Palestine and ultimately to Egypt."The Origin of Pagan Idolatry Ascertained from Historical Testimony, V. 2 p. 490


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 9:51 am 
Around 2500 years ago there was a newly introduced Western hero imprinted on the local gods of Greece, Persia and Egypt. The trait that this hero imprinted on other gods was his ability to suffer on the behalf of others; such heroes, in the plural, were in Greek expressed as the PATHE (the Buddhist BUDDAE, Prakrit PUTHAE), expressed singularly he was the PATHOS and his many other names, such as Sakya and Godama, with all its variations (ex. Zakynthos & Guthan), represent figures synchronized into Western mythology. The “noble yearning”, or, POTHOS, of this PATHOS, or BUDDAS, was to treat the sick, and this created his logia, or PATHOLOGY.

At this very time in Greece, BATHOS (depth) overtook the philosophical use of BENTHOS (depth). The termination of NTH, or INTH, is a pre-Buddhist etymon merely indicating INTHUS, or INDIA, the original source of Buddhist fables.

"That there are startling coincidences between Buddhism and Christianity cannot be denied, and it must likewise be admitted that Buddhism existed at least 400 years before Christianity. I go even further, and should feel extremely grateful if anybody would point out to me the historical channels through which Buddhism had influenced early Christianity." –Max Muller (1883)

This work sets out to show such historical channels by which Buddhism founded Christianity. It may be reasonably certain that Terebinthus, or Buddas, who early church fathers claim had an Indian “gospel” and conversed with the apostles of Jesus, recognized such a revision and equated it with the OT confusion over the names of the Terebinth tree, and knew it as the work of clever Buddhist missionaries who wanted to allegorically spread the fame of their hero who was said to suffer continually for others. In Terebinthus’s doctrine of “Two Principles” we also have the signature mark of the Buddhist revisers in all lands who replaced the concept of “good and bad” with “good or bad”. By doing so they effectively degraded the gods and put Godama in their place.


"The entire character of the course predicated of Sakya Muni in his pre-existent state is an instructive comment on the Buddhistic ideas of the helplessness of man as a moral agent. It is strongly illustrative of the unrest under which all live, who are of woman born, and of their earnest longing for a state of repose. Whilst the necessity of an atonement by substitution is unacknowledged, the thought itself runs through the whole tissue of the wondrous fable: and as it is seen that no intelligence, according to the principles assumed, can perform so great a work as to render him worthy to present a sacrifice that would avail for the salvation of others. This lack is sought to be supplied by multiplied repetition of wise and virtuous acts, that, when taken separately, would be confessedly inadequate for the purpose, but when presented in the mighty aggregate seem to have an excellence beyond all possible estimate. This conception is one of the noblest ever formed in the heathen mind, that a sentient being should voluntarily suffer during myriads of ages for the sake of misguided men” CHRISTIANITY AND BUDDHISM COMPARED, Spence Hardy, p.44.


The monograph 'Jesus's Godama Sources', not pretending to be flawless, contains some uncertain associations. The closer this work gets to the beginning of Scriptural Christianity, the more certain it is that the Christian gospels rest on Buddhist scriptures. One of the central themes to this work is that, due to the most primitive prejudices existing, not only in our religious institutions, but also in our academic institutions, the questions around borrowings between Buddhism and Christianity have never been thoroughly explored. Although the author has serious doubts about his ability as a writer to convey such a borrowing, and, he himself, accepting the occasional blunder, being satisfied beyond any reasonable doubt that Christianity is utterly dependant on Buddhism, published this monograph out of a sense of duty and to spark a broader discussion on Jesus’s Godama sources.


One of Asoka’s edicts has him claim that he caused fishermen to stop fishing. This was later said of Alexander, which is another example of a Buddhist figure taking a Western face. In Plinius's Natural History he attributes Asoka’s claim to Alexander: “Others place the Gedrusi and Sires as covering an area of 138 miles, and then the Fish-eating Oritae, who do not speak the Indian language but have one of their own, covering a space of 200 miles. Alexander made an order forbidding a fish diet to all the Fish-eaters." Plinius says that he is quoting Clearchus of Soli. This is thought to be the same Clearchus who was a disciple of Alexander and who claimed the Jews were Syrians who followed an Indian doctrine. It is said that the Ai Khanoum inscription left by this Clearchus, which were only miles from Asoka’s Kandahar edict in which he claims to have stopped fishermen from fishing, in which the Sanskrit “dharma” (Prakrit dhamma) was translated with Greek “eusebia”, is dated to before Asoka. The inscription is signed by a certain Clearchus, possibly a relative of Clearchus (Klearkhos) of Soli, and claims that it is a copy of a maxim from the wise men of “Pytho”, the odd and popular ancient name for Delphi which is said to derive from a root conveying “to rot”, which, given that the Greek gods were jealous of man’s impermanence, is perhaps the “impermanence”, or “pathos”, or “sickness” of the first Buddhist allegorizers? As the oracles intent was to “persuade” Pytho could be derived from ‘peitho’, which was used, much like our English word “butt”, with intentions of harmonizing through reason. Other features of Delphic Oracle seem to indicate Buddhist propagandists were there in the 6th century B.C., such as the maxims of Pittacus who should be dated to the time of Hegesistratus and Heraclitus. Revealing a Buddhist practice in Delphi, Herodotus says that a certain Pythodorus of Sciyon came to Delphi to offer his cut hair to Apollo (4:33&34) and it is well known that the Egyptian King Amasis dedicated money to help rebuild the oracle; I believe he ran in the same circles as Megabates (Mahabodhi) and that his doctor and advisor was Pythagoras. The inscription left by a certain Clearchus is claimed to have been copied from maxims of Delphi, of which only later sources record. The particular maxim copied by Clearchus comes very close to a proverbial saying Bimbasara was said to have repeated to the Buddha.
Païs ôn kosmios ginou (children, learn good manners)
hèbôn enkratès, (control the passions)
mesos dikaios (in middle be just)
presbutès euboulos (in old age, give good advice)
teleutôn alupos.(die, without regret.)" -Clearchus
“The old man can obtain merit by religion, old age is helpless for the enjoyment of pleasures, therefore they say that pleasures belong to the youngman, wealth to the middle-aged, and religion to the old” The Sacred Books of the East, Volume 49, p. 109


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:17 am 
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Thanks, Daniel. Glad you feel inspired by my work.

I think you've probably plucked up some good facts here. In order to convey them more readily, however, you will need to find a more structured representation and organization. Lumping everything together in huge paragraphs makes it extremely difficult to follow. Smaller paragraphs, highlights in bold, lists, side-by-side charts, subtitles, block quotes, images - these are all vital in making sifting through such a mass easier.

I give you this advice, of course, because you are presenting valuable insights, but they will be lost on the vast majority. Believe me, I understand that, even with my techniques as above, a significant amount of the information I present tends to make people's eyes cross. Math has the same effect on me. :roll:

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Why suffer from Egyptoparallelophobia, when you can read Christ in Egypt? Try it - you'll like it:

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2013 9:08 am 
Dear Acharya,
As a whole I argue that we are spoon fed too much, in some respects,when history has been so badly handled, historical revisers may require great readers and it is with this mindset that I approach your work also!

The ancient Buddhists were like those who wrote their names in water. I claim to be able to track these elusive people and my report is not drawn out in chapter form, it includes almost 400 footnotes and reuqries the raeedr’s cmolpete aetnttoin!

If a system claims to be parasitic (the meaning of the pipal tree) we would expect a report of its spread to read like one big parallelomaniaism! Here the scholars have also failed to point to a mania which prevents scholars from seeing parallels; this particular mania may be based mostly on the idea that Judaism and Christianity were totally original dogmas.

In my monograph I have arranged the relevant material, which spans the globe, as carefully as possible. Here I am only working from my notes and, unless someone buys me dinner, because, as the worker is worth their due, and, because I would rather cast confusion than pearls to racists and the like, at this time I can only give a tease. Till then, I hope you find my jottings challenging and if you have a specific question, please ask.

The following Ethiopian Christian legend is based on several Jatakas. As mentioned already, the signet ring as a marker to identify a man's true father appears mostly in Buddhist tales and in Indian epics besides its brief appearence in the Prodigal Son, with Polycrates, Ogyges, etc.. In the Buddhist Lost Son parable we are told that the father sent spies out to find his son. In Luke’s version we are to believe that the son’s father had some sort of device to inform him when his son decided to return home, and by what direction. An out of place meaning has been copied (see my monograph for many more) possibly to mark the true source.

Rahula, the Buddha's "only {blood} son", and the Bodhisattvas, are said to be able to spot the real Buddha in a sea of clones. "And no person knows the Father--only the Son knows the Father...” The story of a young prince going to an exotic land to impress the foreign king, has children with his favorite daughter, spreads his system, and, usually without child support arrangements (ha), returns home, is admittedly an ancient male story, perhaps as old as testosterone, but the following tale seems to also be indebted to the similar Buddhist legends.

Queen Makeda learns from Tamrin, a merchant based in her kingdom, about the wisdom of King Solomon, and travels to Jerusalem to visit him. She is enthralled by his display of learning and knowledge, and declares "From this moment I will not worship the sun, but will worship the Creator of the sun, the God of Israel." (chapter 28) The night before she begins her journey home, Solomon tricks her into sleeping with him, and gives her a ring so that their child may identify himself to Solomon [ see KATTHAHARI-JATAKA] Following her departure, Solomon has a dream in which the sun leaves Israel (chapter 30). On the journey home, she gives birth to Menelik. Menelik travels to Jerusalem by way of Gaza, seeking Solomon's blessing, and [b][u]identifies himself to his father with the ring. Overjoyed by this reunion, Solomon tries to convince Menelik to stay and succeed him as king, but Menelik insists on returning to his mother in Ethiopia. This company of young men, upset over leaving Jerusalem, then smuggle the Ark from the Temple and out of Solomon's kingdom (chapters 45-48) without Menelik's knowledge. He had asked of Solomon only for a single tassel from the covering over the Ark, and Solomon had given him the entire cloth.

The Queen of Makeda, where Makeda comes very close to Magadha. Buddas also claims a similar mother and his claiming to be born of a soldier also has parallels to early accounts of Jesus and Theudas, whom may have been Buddas.

"The ordinary term for the vagrancy of a religious mendicant is, in Sanscrit, Parayatana, from peri about and atana roaming: and Pery-ataca is a person, who follows that life...The sentiments which Barzouyeh in the fourth chapter of the Arabic translation, is supposed to utter, on the vanity of the world, and the excellency of austerity and religious mortification, are quite compatible with those, of either a Christian monk, or a Bauddha ascetic, and tend to confirm his Indian origin. At the same time he is made, in the same chapter, to describe himself, as the son of a Soldier, by a women of the Magian order; so that if his Arabic or Pahlavi biographer be correct, his Indian descent becomes, if not doubtful, at least remote. Whatever conclusion we may draw, however, on this particular point, the different circumstances leave little doubt, that in the early centuries of our era, a religious, as well as a literary intercourse, existed between India and Persia" The Oriental Magazine, and Calcutta Review, p. 497


Buddas was called Terebinthus, named after the turpentine tree, or the Butm tree. My monograph shows that this tree was very sacred with the earliest Jews Christians and Muslims. It was confused often for the oak (el, or ar) and Josephus calls the oak, or terebinth, of Abraham's Ogyges, the Buddhist Okkaka, who also gave his name to the Egyptian Acacia (though the root ak-, 'point'; Coptic for turpentine tree (fr, Greek) SEQEMON, or SAQAMROS for mulberry, or sycamore.

Translators who consider the obscure elon moreh of Genesis 12:6 to be the name of a locality render it as “the plains of Moreh.” Translators who consider the “Moreh” to signify a sacred tree often render it Terebinth, for them, at Shechem (Sakyan), grew the Terebinth. (Elone moreh; Oak/Arya [of the] Mauryan, or “sycamore,” or “Sakya-Maurya” which marks the Egyptian Tale of Sinuhe as being introduced by Buddhists as the sycamore is this hero’s tree of life as well as Hathor’s, who is the goddess of foreigners.) Here “moreh” may have the sense of “marry,” and when named Moriah, it doubles as Mount Meru.

It is mentioned here that Chandragupta, Moses, and Jesus have mother’s named Mary. The Samaritan religion, claims the hill of Gerizm, which comes very close to the Griha, or royal house, of Magadha where was the Buddhist KutaGARASALAM. Mount Gerizm is said to have been founded at the time of a great schism, and a later Jewish schism would was settled by Ptolemy VI Philometer when he executed two Samaritan scholars and recognized the claim of Andronicus ben Meshullam that the true Jewish church was not at Gerizim.

Jesus downplays the importance of such disputes about the schism which divided the Samaritans and the other Jews who believed that God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac on another hill (John 4:21). The Samaritans were also in Shechem, a place that the Gospel of John calls “Sycham,” Hebrew “Shiqmar,” or the “sycamine” of Luke 17:6, which has clear Buddhist sources, or “Sakyamuni tree,” the Egyptian child/fig-tree altar “Sekhem”

Confirming this, and a split between the holy terebinth and the holy oak tree, is that the modern name of this place is Tell-Balata, the “Balata” is said to be from the Greek word “platanus,” which was a word Greeks used for the terebinth tree, probably because it was so close in meaning to the Tree of Hippocrates which was another stand-in for the pipal tree; this tree is also said to be the tree “Platanus orientalis.” This is also known in Central Asia and India as the “chinar tree”; “chinar” includes the ancient Iranian root for “China.” This tree may have been confused for the terebinth tree at an early age, and it further parallels the pipal tree in that Zoroastrian priests also believed that they could forecast events based on the movement of the leaves of this tree (said of Zeus’ oak).

That the “ELAH,” or “Arya,” tree, which in Hebrew would signify God in the feminine case, was the representative Pipal tree is supported by Isaiah who identifies it with the offspring of Melchizedek just as the Sakyas are identified with the grove of saka trees (“ellei ha-tzedek,” Jesus’s word for father). According to the Mahaparinibbana sutta, the earliest Buddhist Mauryas also claimed to be from a place near a pipal tree grove (Pippalivana).

Some connect the Mauryas to the warrior class, who the Buddhist texts say have mixed also with sudras, their names appear from Taxila to Merv and from east of the Black Sea down through Scythopolis to Egypt, this was the top half of the east/west trade route. A theorized connection to the Mauryas can be made to the Indian peacock (Sans. “maurya,” or “zikhin”), which was in Greece with the Buddhists 500 B.C. and fascinated Alexander the Great. Given the Brahmin myth that Sudras were essentially born from the feet of Brahma and Epiphanius’s words on the peacock: “When he sees his feet, he screams wildly, thinking that they are not in keeping with the rest of his body.” Although it may just be a poetic interpretation of symbolism, the Buddhist peacock may represent their rewriting the myth that sudras were the feet of the divine man, that everyone has to get their feet ruffed up a little


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2013 9:31 am 
"The banyan is the Indian Fig tree which gives its name to the genus (bot. Ficus Indica). The pipal is pronounced like "people" (bot. Ficus religiosa). There are probably hundreds of species of each of these genera throughout India, the tropical East and the South-Sea Islands. Every district in India has its own specific varieties developed by quality and depth of soil, nearness to water in the subsoil, and equable quality of heat or the reverse. The true India-rubber tree is the Ficus elastica, not much cultivated in Indian towns, as it is not a good shade-tree, and is rather straggling in growth. It is common enough as a single stalk handsome pot-plant in London windows, and therefore should be known in the United States.

These three species are quite unlike the Indian wild fig-tree, which again has no resemblance in leaf, stalk or trunk to the edible fig-tree of Europe and the Bible, which was originally brought from Persia. All these genera are alike however in the shape of the fruit, in that remarkable characteristic that the flowers and seeds are inside the fruit adhering to the inner surface of its skin, and that the seed fruit is not in a separate capsule at the root of the corolla of the flower. This characteristic is I believe possessed by no other fruit. The fig bears a remarkable resemblance to the womb -envelope in animals and man. A spiritual symbolical significance is given to it from this characteristic by Dr. Anna Kingford in her "Perfect Way, or the Finding of Christ," which is worthy of close study.

The vernacular name of the banyan-tree in Western Indian is "wud" (the "u" pronounced as in "rut") or "burr" according to the language of the district. The Sanskrit word is "wut" (as in "hut") This apparently got corrupted into "bo," a Pali vernacular corruption, probably adopted because it is like the Sanskrit root word of "bodh" (as in "road"), "understanding" "knowledge," the same root word as in "Buddha," the wise, the enlightened one (the "u" pronounced as in "hood").

Though the banyan and the pipal are par excellence the sacred trees of India, I do not think that this sacred character is preferable to them as bearing figs. The symbology of Dr. Anna Kingsford is true, but it does not appeal to the Hindu mind. The sacred Sanskrit name of the banyan-tree is "Ashwattha," derived from "Ashwa-stha" "for horses-a standing place," i.e., a shady resting place in the noon-day heat. It gives the thickest, coolest, largest mass of shade of any tree in the East. Ordinary trees decay and die:-so does not the Ashwattha, because, from the time of its early youth, pendent roots begin to grow down from the main boughs at every few feet: and these rootlets as soon as they touch the ground thicken out into separate trees, thus forming a series of columns for the support of other boughs which, though gnarled and crooked in shape grow out horizontally somewhat as does the cedar. When this tree is planted in a deep loamy soil, in bottom land near a river or tank, it grows rapidly and spreads out to an enormous area, limited only by proximity to cultivated ground, for no cultivator can get a crop when shaded by trees. Hence the charitable pious Hindu is accustomed to bequeath a plot of land alongside a public path and to plant it with mango-trees, the shade-tree next best to the banyan, both of which grow new leaves before the old leaves fall. He also digs a tank or builds a well. He selects the mango because “of its luscious fruit. But when he builds a temple, he also builds a well or tank and plants the banyan. Why? Because the property of growing roots from the boughs makes it everlasting. It never dies, and has thus become to the Hindu, the living symbol of immortality.

Indian histories describe a banyan-tree which is said to exist on an island in the river Narbaddda in Western India. This tree is said to be half a mile across, large enough to shelter several regiments of soldiers. I have camped for months under a banyan 300 feet diameter, the root columns growing about forty feet apart. Cattle eat the rootlets greedily, and so prevent the tree from becoming choked by its exuberant growth. The above word "stha" is the root word of "stand," "stay" and "station," both through the Latin and other European dialects. "Ashwattha" was debased in later Sanskrit into "wut."

The Characteristic of immortality and the shade-giving quality of the banyan are beautifully described in the Bhagavad Gita in the Parable of the Indian Fig-tree. "They speak of the eternal Indian Fig-tree, whose roots do from its spreading branches grow. Its broad thick leaves give grateful covert in the noon-day heat. He knows the secret teaching, which the meaning of its growth has learned." Sir Edwin Arnold in his translation, "The Song Celestial," has missed the meaning in the line, "Its leaves are green and waving hymns." The columnar roots make the tree stable as a rock. The leaves and stalks are too thick to wave.

The leaves measure five by eight inches and are thick and massive, like the boughs growing horizontally, on stout sturdy stalks. Thus overlapping each other the shade is perfect. I send you a box of leaves with the stalk on which they grow, a month old. Also a root of three years, none feet long, cut from a tree in my garden thirteen years old. The banyan is perfect in its nature. Its shade is a blessing in the tropics; its leaves have kept many cattle from starving during the still current famine, and it points to that longed-for state of immortality into which we enter when we pass over the river, and leave this changing life behind.

But the sacred pipal-tree is a fraud, a lazy useless parasite. "The banyan-fig is half an inch in diameter, the pipal three eighths of an inch-both are eaten greedily by birds, squirrels and monkeys. The pipal is sacred because its leaf is heart-shaped, with a long depending tip which makes the leaf an emblem of nature-and a symbol of the female creative form. Hence it is made an object of worship by debased Hindus. These leaves hang vertically from a long pendulous stalk, and as they grow sparsely on tall boughs, their shade is worthless. It loses all its leaves just when wanted for shade, at the commencement of summer heat. The pipal is self-planted by the droppings of a bird lodging in the fork of a tree. The seeds are the smallest in the world, and they grow into a tree sometimes 100 ft high. The roots grow rapidly down the trunk on which it started life. Root after root grows around the parent trunk, the young roots interlacing each other till the original tree is smothered, choked and dies. The pipal then grows out thick buttress-roots just above the ground and so gains strength to stand alone.

The pipal is planted by Hindus in their gardens. It is picked off the tree on which it has begun life, and is propped up till it grows strong. It is planted for "good luck" for the same reason that a horse-shoe is nailed on the door-sill, as being an emblem of the creative force of nature. I send you two photographs of the banyan and pipal trees, both apparently planted together, and now 200 years old. The near photograph shows the interlacing roots of the pipal round the banyan trunk. The far photograph shows the tall pipal-boughs bare of leaves, the lower spreading banyan-boughs giving the only shade. It is at the corner of a very large excavated tank on which grows the giant rose-colored lotus-flower eight inches in diameter, a true water-lily. On the right are priests seated chanting in a temple-hut. The shadow of a Roman Catholic Cross is in the foreground. A strange contrast! This banyan-tree shows many roots which being on the road, cannot reach the ground."



“The unarmed betoum and the armed jujube have a very interesting relationship, which is as follows: When the seeds of the betoum germinate the seedling is eagerly eaten by animals if it chances, as is usually the case, that the germination occurs on the open daya floor: but if the seeds are carried to a Zizyphus and germinate in its midst, the young plants may attain to a considerable height before being seen by animals, and, being protected by the encircling jujube, will continue growing until they are too large to be easily killed through grazing. It usually happens that once the betoum plant appears above the top of the protecting shrub the camels attempt to reach the attractive shoots and the jujube is trodden under foot. The jujube is thus ultimately destroyed and a mound around the base of the young betoum is all of it that remains…If the jujube is relatively small and the developing betoum is discovered while still small, it will be much eaten and probably killed; but if it reaches a considerable height before the discovery is made only the lower brances will be devoured and the specimen will survive… From what we have already seen regarding the ill effect of grazing, it will appear that the relation between the betoum and the jujube is a very vital one to the former; and it probably is not too much to say that the distribution of the betoum in the daya region is entirely dependent on that of the jujube.” —Botanical features of the Algerian Sahara, p. 34.

Knowing that the Buddhists revered their Pipal tree for its ability to use and overtake the Brahmin tree, they may have seen a similar quality in the invasive Butomus grass, the name of which is said to derive from “bu” (ox) and “tom” (cut), allegedly referring to grass which cows liked to eat after “cutting” the grass, although the grass is said to only thrive in water that may be too deep for most cows.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:13 am 
Buddha in Memphis 520 B.C.

Hard to sum up what happens to chronologies when Buddha is placed here at this time.


Aamerigo 11
Aanguttara Nikaya 252
Aantiochus 98, 175, 176, 232
Aantiyako (See: Aantiochus)
Aasokavadana 44, 159, 178, 187, 189, 199, 236, 240, 257, 266
abbhasaras 207
abc 69
Abed 244
Abgar 76, 123
abhibhayatana 229
Abimelech 99, 100
abiron 258
ablative 96
abodah 266
abolished (See: taxes)
abracadabra 145
Abraham 11, 23, 53, 54, 89, 91, 93, 170, 196, 197, 203, 224, 261, 266
Abrasax 224
abuyha 75
acacia (See: Ogyges, Okkaka)
acacius 175
academy 145
Acaea (See: Okkaka)
accursed 182
Achaea 28, 90, 170, 172, 174
Achaemenes, haxa-manis (See: sakyamunis)
Achaeus 170, 172, 174
Acharya, D.M. Murdock 17
Achiacharus 178
acta archaelus 225
acta archelai 103
Adam 12, 119, 219, 260
Addas, variant of Buddas 75
adhas, Hades 191
Adimantus 75
Admetus 85
Aeacus (See: Okkaka)
Aegiochos (See: Okkaka)
Aegisthus 170, 172, 174
Aegyptus 70, 170, 172, 174
aeon 39
aeons 126
Aesop (See: Bodhisattva)
Aesop's 8
Africa 9, 10, 11, 22, 26, 27, 28, 46, 48, 65, 67, 90, 92, 97, 145, 184, 242
Agag (See: Okkaka)
Agariste 51
Agatha-daemon 246
Agathocles 67
Agathyrsi 43
Agathyrsus 43
Agganna, sutta 204, 207
Agni 13, 59, 74, 75, 87, 108, 128, 143, 150, 174, 185, 200, 201, 215, 220, 221, 225, 240, 243
agnus 143
Ahasureus 11
aisopeia 195
ajanta 27, 74, 143
Ajatasatru 43, 51, 59, 63, 64, 95, 207
ajax (See: Okkaka)
Akademos, Plato 145
akakia 182
Akkad 170
Al-beruni 57
al-kheir (See: butm, tree)
Alassada, Alexandria 66
alcibiades 121
Alexandria 10, 15, 21, 27, 29, 41, 48, 66, 70, 74, 76, 80, 83, 84, 101, 105, 111, 123, 126, 135, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 150, 156, 175, 176, 184, 187, 195, 198, 199, 209, 217, 224, 230, 231, 232, 235, 240, 241, 245, 248, 261
alexandrian 17, 57, 78, 114, 115, 204, 210, 227, 231, 240, 241, 242
alexandrians 70, 224, 228, 248
alfather 37, 110
allegory 3, 13, 22, 39, 43, 76, 85, 86, 88, 95, 97, 102, 109, 112, 128, 138, 139, 140, 146, 147, 151, 156, 159, 160, 170, 175, 196, 203, 218, 219, 222, 224, 249, 256, 260, 265
alpha 178, 179
alpha-beta 88
alphabet 25, 178, 179, 242
alphabets 179
altar 29, 70, 71, 78, 113, 182, 217, 219, 221
altars 78, 221
amalaki 12
amaleki 12
Amalekite 11
Amalekites 11, 12, 41
Ambastae 198
Ambattha 95, 138, 170, 196, 197, 200, 260
ambrosia 86, 131, 185, 266
amogha (See: omega)
Amos 70, 192
amrita 216, 240
amun 181, 266
Anacharsis 63
anatomy 241
Angaras, the angels (See: angel)
angel 5, 12, 77, 78, 96, 108, 116, 125, 145, 157, 182, 194, 203, 256, 262, 271
angelos 34, 194
Angirasa 194
angro-minyus 92
Angulimala 182, 265
Anguttara Nikaya 212
anjali (See: angelos)
anjana 60
anointed 87, 177, 181, 199, 200, 201, 220, 224
anointing 83, 220
anoints 202
Anshan 229
antediluvian 85
anti-buddha 228
anti-mahayana 4
anti-orientalism 231
anti-slavery 144, 222
antichrist 2, 42, 243
Antioch 55, 70, 101, 204, 219, 224, 232
Anubis, & Bata 21, 60, 90, 178, 181, 187, 189
apis 59, 60, 184, 185, 186
apocalypse 264
apocrypha 223, 256, 257
Apollo 13, 15, 17, 22, 32, 40, 82, 85, 98, 106, 148, 160, 170, 176, 203, 231, 242, 246, 247
Apollonius 43, 89, 101, 103, 128, 219, 224
apothegms 210
arapacana 179
Archelai, Acta 103
Archelaus 72
archon 137
argonauts 41, 220
arhat 151
arian 175
arianism 14
Arimathea 89
aristotle 34, 43, 58, 74, 79, 176, 214, 233
ark 21, 95, 96, 244
arkabandhu 75
arrian 11, 59, 68, 177
Artaphernes 55
Artemis 98, 246
arthurian 5, 115, 118, 183, 255
arya 14, 43, 50, 57, 62, 91, 170, 172, 174, 178
aryabandhu 33
Aryadeva 68, 167
Aryaman 151, 152
Asoka 4, 12, 13, 14, 18, 20, 32, 34, 44, 56, 61, 62, 65, 66, 67, 71, 72, 83, 86, 96, 97, 101, 108, 109, 115, 128, 138, 145, 149, 150, 155, 159, 160, 173, 175, 176, 180, 182, 184, 186, 187, 198, 199, 200, 201, 203, 204, 212, 215, 218, 220, 222, 229, 231, 232, 236, 240, 241, 242, 243, 255, 257, 266, 268, 269
Asokavamsa 198
astragalus 83
astrape 176
astrological 83, 87, 181, 228
astrology 42, 87, 116, 198, 266
Astyages 59, 60
asura 23, 128
asuras 62, 92, 170, 172, 174, 219
asva-sakyas 55
Asvaghosa 48, 153, 224, 253
asylum 97
atheism 12
atheist 80
atheistic 262
atheists 12
Athens 52, 62, 87, 101, 149, 177, 242, 247, 253
atonement 46
Atreus 170, 172, 174
attha 229
attic 71
attica 13, 106, 170, 172, 174, 204
Augustine 42, 80, 101, 121, 129, 164, 207, 209, 213, 214
Augustus 24, 44, 45, 76, 84, 116, 158, 170, 172, 174, 253
aum 178
autopsies 241
autopsy 241
avadana 38, 129, 253
Avalokitesvara 38, 39, 42, 65, 165, 202, 208, 216, 246
axis-mundi 23
ayurvedic 24, 113
Azrael 182
Babel 25, 50, 51
Babylon 25, 50, 54, 58, 60, 67, 96, 118, 225, 236
Babylonian 29, 36, 50, 54, 58, 62, 106, 178, 180, 228
Babylonians 44, 68
Bacchus 50, 59, 98, 150, 183, 185
Bactria 51, 60, 80, 83, 104, 107, 111, 112, 154, 231
Bactrian 45, 72, 178, 241
Bahuda (See: jhelum)
Bal-rama 180
Balaam, see Barlaam 28, 96
balata (See: terebinth, as the butm tree)
Balluka 59, 266
banyan, tree 14, 38, 140
baptism 44, 116, 132, 165, 220
baptist 83, 119, 148
baptize 220
Barbarossa 259
Bardaisan 54
Barlaam 10, 28, 30, 33, 53, 192, 203
Barlaam & Josaphat 203
Barnabas 158
Basilides 95, 103, 137, 144, 224, 226, 232, 235
Bata 21, 56, 59, 60, 85, 90, 178, 181, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 254
Batenites 102
Batraz 218, 255
battologia 85
Battus 85, 106, 114
baudo-briga 70
Baveru (See: Babylon)
Bbimbasara 54, 56, 63, 76, 123, 240
bdellium 11, 83
beads (See: rosaries)
beatitude 151, 229
beatitudes 229
bedouin 139
beer 19, 20, 96, 99, 100, 181, 189, 197
Beersheba 97
Behistun inscription 68, 84
bell 223
bells 168, 223, 253
belly 6, 33, 188, 216
Benares 26, 49, 178, 180, 203
bene-kadam 25
benthos 29
Beowulf 39, 40, 255
Bernike 65, 66, 123
beryl 199
beth-wd 70
Bethel 97, 98
Bethlehem 239, 271
Betonim, biblical town named after the Butm tree; 88
Bhadra; Per. vardana 54
Bhaishagyaraga 128
Bhallika; one of two brother from Yangon who traded with Sri Lanka and are said to have enshrined the Buddha's hair there. 266
bhanaka (See: phoenix)
bhurja; see birch 19
Bhutan 60
bianneches; see bhanaka & phoenix 189
Bihar, see beer 96, 160, 197, 198
Bindusara 232
binth, senthos 138
birch, Pali bhurja 19, 20, 36, 44
bird 17, 50, 89, 128, 129, 141, 170, 189, 242, 246, 253, 257
birds 50, 132, 170, 197, 242, 257, 266
Blemmya, Africans named in the Buddhist Vinaya 60, 146
bodhi 13, 14, 17, 18, 21, 29, 87, 89, 90, 95, 96, 97, 108, 114, 139, 141, 147, 155, 160, 170, 182, 199, 216, 218, 219, 234, 257, 266
Bodhidharma 5, 11
Bodhisattva 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 13, 21, 22, 23, 30, 34, 36, 42, 44, 53, 65, 75, 86, 87, 114, 119, 120, 121, 122, 125, 128, 131, 135, 138, 141, 142, 155, 159, 160, 165, 178, 183, 192, 195, 197, 198, 201, 202, 206, 210, 218, 228, 229, 233, 234, 235, 237, 240, 250, 253, 254, 255, 257, 264, 266
Boeothius 55
Boeotia 87, 170, 172, 173, 174, 175, 179, 245
Boetheus 70
Boethus, of Alexandria 70, 125
Boethusians 69, 70
Bootes 4, 85, 244
bopal, Mawla 50
borobudur 228
borromean rings, first beings a representation of the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha 217
boswellia 83
bottomry 50
Boutta, Clement's rendering of Buddha 168
Brachmanes, Brahmin 45, 150, 177, 223, 242
brahmi, Asoka's script 11, 18, 33, 56, 65, 72, 86, 96, 113, 143, 145, 175, 178, 179, 200, 221, 248
brahmin 9, 11, 32, 33, 47, 50, 56, 57, 68, 70, 91, 122, 170, 195, 196, 197, 198, 204, 259, 260, 265, 269
brahmins 25, 42, 43, 45, 50, 52, 60, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 73, 137, 138, 143, 146, 155, 168, 170, 177, 180, 181, 185, 197, 201, 210, 215, 218, 221, 223, 238, 242, 256, 261, 264, 265
bramble-king 99
Branmajala sutta 125
bread 88, 119, 120, 137, 142, 146, 158, 201, 238, 254
Brer, rabbit 9
Brihadaranyaka Upanishad 207
bucephalus 86
Budapest 76, 96
Budauns 173
Buddam, Jerome's rendering of Buddha 168
Buddas 28, 29, 38, 72, 75, 81, 95, 101, 102, 103, 110, 111, 113, 126, 168, 225
Buddha-carita 48, 120, 140, 145, 256
Buddha-commune, ptocheum 97
Buddhagama, a Buddhist phrase for Buddhism 258
Buddhaghosa 212, 239, 253
Buddhahood 122, 125, 199, 229, 262, 263, 266, 270
Buddhas 29, 42, 49, 59, 71, 76, 80, 97, 115, 123, 153, 183, 184, 187, 222, 228, 229, 249, 253, 257, 260
Buddhavamsa 249
Buddwas, the Celtic Buddha 71, 76, 105, 106, 139
Budii, a tribe mentioned by Herodotus 62, 73
bull 18, 32, 56, 60, 86, 96, 184, 185, 186, 187, 189, 217
bull-tamer 185
Butes 71, 266
butm, tree 81, 84, 88, 95, 102
Buto 85, 106, 187, 231, 246, 247
Butos, Clemens pun on God/ Buddha/bosom 29, 160
butter 56, 121, 140, 150, 151, 152, 177, 201, 207, 220, 240, 253
butu, wall of Timbuktu 97
bythos, seen binth, benthos & buddas 29, 75, 76
Caananites 93
Cadmilus 106
Cadmus 12, 40, 105, 106, 145, 170, 172, 174, 175, 179
caduceus 18, 86, 131
Caesar 24, 35, 44, 45, 49, 71, 76, 84, 116
cairn 71, 152
Calani, what Aristotle calls the Jews in Syria 79
Calanus 34, 89, 176, 177, 194
calendar 44, 58, 83, 84, 113, 116, 153, 195, 230, 239, 245
calendars 35
Cambodians 60
Cambyses 51, 59, 60, 61, 180, 182, 185, 186, 197
cannabis 26, 42, 112
Capernaum 31
capitalism 26, 243
carpenters 14
Caspian 119
caste 58, 91, 164, 170, 172, 174, 180, 195, 196, 197, 205, 217, 242, 243, 265
catacomb, Sans. kata-kumbha 148
Catholic 10, 167, 217, 229
catuskoti, Grk. Tetralemma 33
Catusparisat Sutra 152
Caulacau 137
cedar 118, 181, 182, 189
Celtic 13, 14, 36, 37, 85, 106, 110, 139, 183
Celts 14, 17, 55, 70, 71, 139
cetiya jataka 257
Ceylon 13, 106
Chaeremon 21
chaitya 114, 247
chakravarti 189
chakravartin 97, 150, 239
Chaldean 29, 98, 178
chariot 25, 33, 35, 58, 188, 191, 229
charioteer 35, 170, 188
Chechous, a rendering of Okkaka which became affixed to Christian names 170, 172, 174
China 5, 11, 24, 30, 32, 33, 37, 46, 57, 61, 91, 111, 113, 115, 116, 120, 129, 133, 153, 186, 200, 215, 219, 228, 231, 245, 256, 257, 268
chinar 91
Chinese 13, 16, 23, 32, 38, 43, 48, 55, 60, 63, 76, 83, 89, 113, 116, 129, 158, 175, 183, 191, 195, 201, 202, 205, 214, 222, 228, 246, 257, 269
chittaikogrutaa, translated into NT Greek as monotrichous 123
choirs, alternating 10
Chrestos 220, 224, 241
Chriophorus, a name of Mercury 87
Christ 3, 10, 11, 17, 20, 31, 42, 47, 72, 74, 75, 77, 92, 113, 116, 120, 139, 146, 168, 204, 215, 217, 225, 246, 249, 250, 257, 260
Christianized 30, 225, 268
Christmas 14, 20, 108, 217, 218, 229
Christopher 5, 87, 124, 197, 215, 259
Christos 95, 152, 220, 224, 233, 253
Cicero 13, 44, 150
cintamani jewel, the Jewish murhe 39, 232
circle 11, 14, 17, 19, 58, 69, 78, 86, 96, 101, 108, 131, 140, 179, 200, 207
circled 12, 14, 17, 97, 266
circles 91, 116, 223
circling 34, 91, 194
circuit 35
circular 83, 217, 223
circumambulation 17, 24
Cleitarchos 38
Clemens 27, 29, 111
Clement 80, 84, 105, 111, 145, 156, 168, 172, 209, 214, 232
Cleopatra 195
Clitarchus 21
clockwise 12, 56, 199
codex 36, 72
Codomannus, another name for the Darius known to Alexander 184
Columbus 10, 166
conch 112, 191
Confucius 74, 186, 228
Coptic 56, 68, 86, 95, 105, 106, 150
copycat, on first contact Christians accuse Buddhists 10
coronation 77, 220
Cronus 181, 183
crucified 78, 89, 96, 129, 134, 140, 141, 155, 181, 195, 244
crucifixion 6, 178, 225, 238, 247, 260
Ctesias 67
Cubricus 72, 74, 75
cuckoo 13, 245, 246
Cuthites 106
Cyprus 75, 150
Cyrene 85, 106, 114, 184, 186, 195
Cyril 73, 74, 75, 102, 111, 113, 114, 225
Daena; compared to Yama 65
daimons; first being Bodhisattvas 21
dama, accepts suffering from a snakebite accepts a spell from Jesus Ben Panderai 241
Damascenus, Nicolaus 32
Damascus 88, 214
Danaans 170, 172, 174
Danaus 170, 172, 174
Danavas 170, 172, 174, 219
Danaveghasa 170, 172, 174
Dandamis 210
Dandipani, as Nababopolassar 84
Dane 40, 109
Danes 219
Danube 76
Darius 35, 50, 54, 55, 56, 57, 61, 62, 63, 64, 71, 84, 86, 88, 95, 143, 146, 150, 180, 184, 195, 196, 205
Darius Hydaspes 61
David 22, 45, 70, 180, 221, 243, 244
Davids, Rhys 67, 141, 152, 164, 208
Delphi 39, 255
Derbikes 67, Sans. Dharbaka, Ajatasatru; see Avanti Jataka for the relation between Vidudabha and Ajatasatru
deva-putras 221
Devadatta 22, 35, 59, 92, 138, 153, 199, 254, 258, 267
devil 7, 10, 42, 52, 53, 73, 74, 89, 95, 115, 117, 119, 120, 124, 126, 140, 208, 217, 219, 229, 258
dhamma 33, 47, 65, 72, 213, 226
dhammapada, Sans. dharmapada 31, 85, 151, 213, 256, 268
dharani 95, 126, 247, 250
dharma-bhanaka 229
dharma-pratirupaka, the phrasing for the counterfeit Buddhist religion 73
digha-nikaya 158
Diodorus 180, 247
Dionysus 43, 150
Dipankara 39, 152, 202
doceticism 80
docetics 80
docetism 233
eagle 39, 131
Ebionites 116
Ecbatana 97
Ecclesiastes 53
Ecclesiastical 44
Eddas 36, 110
Eden 21, 83, 180
edicts, of Asoka 56, 160, 199, 215
Egypt 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 33, 50, 57, 58, 59, 60, 62, 63, 66, 70, 74, 77, 84, 85, 106, 113, 128, 131, 132, 144, 146, 150, 153, 170, 172, 174, 178, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 195, 232, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 271
Egyptian 2, 8, 11, 17, 23, 24, 25, 27, 28, 34, 35, 41, 50, 65, 66, 70, 72, 76, 85, 91, 97, 122, 129, 144, 170, 175, 177, 178, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 186, 187, 188, 189, 195, 198, 214, 219, 241, 244, 247, 256, 259, 266
Egyptologists 24, 184
eight-beatitudes 229
eight-fold 72, 124, 221, 229
eight-legged 124
eight-legs 109
eight-sided 195, 217
eka-gotra 129
eka-putta 236
eka-yana 129
elephant 14, 96, 143, 145, 173, 180, 185, 256, 270
Elephantine 178
elephants 112, 173, 229
Elkesai's book 116
Emmanuel, see Aryaman 42, 151
Empedocles 28, 66
emptiness 4, 29, 42, 75, 121, 224
Enoch; Chanukah, or Khanug 170
Epicurean paradox 69
Epicurus 69
epigrams 248
Epiphanius 10, 72, 102, 114, 115, 116, 137, 142, 149, 195, 225, 232
Ethiopians 59, 248
Etruscan 41, 43, 86, 96
eusebius 227, 248
ezekiel 191, 199, 222
Fa-hien 201
fable 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 28, 30, 32, 50, 51, 62, 84, 90, 112, 128, 181, 191, 197, 218, 233, 236, 255, 267
Fausboll, V. 9, 152, 209, 230, 231, 265
fig 13, 14, 17, 89, 95, 99, 108, 116, 140, 202, 216, 229, 234, 259, 266
fig-tree 91
fly, or levitation 4, 10, 103, 106, 214
Gadgadasvara, Bodhisattva 75
Gandhara 36, 44, 47, 56, 74, 173, 177, 218, 220, 243, 255
gandharas 58
gandharvas 128, 192
ganesh 75
ganitra, see gematria 83
Gaotema, Avest. rendering of Godama 179
garanus, see karunas 13
Garbe, Richard; Buddhist scholar 124, 215
Garizim, Mount 98
garuda, the Christian eagle 39, 128, 131, 178
gayatri, meter of 8.8.8. 215, 221, 229
gematria 77, 78, 83, 96, 101, 135, 137, 138, 178, 221, 226, 228, 248, 265
gemini 181
germanes, see sramana 71, 76, 150
Gethsemane 121
ghee, a Pali word for butter 25, 151, 158, 201, 207, 220
ghrita, a Sanskrit word butter 83, 95, 140, 152, 181, 200, 220, 233, 240, 253, 266
ghrsti, Sanskrit word which became Christ 200
giant 17, 154
gnosticism 72, 101, 104, 111, 114, 115, 137, 245
Godama, or Gautama 12, 18, 19, 25, 32, 36, 37, 42, 52, 56, 57, 58, 65, 84, 89, 90, 95, 96, 97, 105, 108, 109, 110, 119, 129, 155, 159, 170, 178, 181, 183, 184, 185, 187, 198, 205, 207, 225, 262
Gomata 44, 49, 50, 54, 56, 57, 58, 61, 185
Gondophares 242
Goshen 25
gothic 11, 12, 13, 16, 17, 19, 29, 36, 37, 39, 56, 57, 66, 71, 77, 83, 92, 106, 109, 110, 215, 218, 219, 221
goths 12, 14, 26, 32, 36, 53, 71, 88, 105, 107, 108, 109, 110, 167, 184, 200, 218, 219, 225, 229
grail, holy 218
Greco-Buddhist 18, 47, 48, 74, 177, 178, 239, 242, 245
Greece 33, 35, 51, 62, 63, 78, 79, 106, 135, 145, 148, 169, 170, 172, 173, 174, 186, 210, 246, 248, 258, 266
Gymnosophists 172, 247
gypsies 195
Hagar 170
Hamilton, Alexander 84, 85
haritaki, myrobalan 128
harmonia, see sramana 102
Haxamanis, as Sakyamuni 26, 54, 56, 62, 63, 65
hecatompylos, as the Sanskrit satadvars 241
Hegesias, philosopher 144, 195
helen 145
hell 6, 23, 38, 39, 40, 65, 68, 77, 87, 138, 151, 152, 188, 202, 208, 233, 258, 261
hellenes 138, 152, 170, 172, 174
hellenic 74, 132, 146, 147, 197, 205, 246
hellenism 82, 129
hellenistic 38, 146, 224
hellenized 10, 29, 39, 67, 68, 70, 82, 95, 152, 176, 195, 215, 247
hellenizers 102, 152
Hellios 149
hemp 69, 112, 121, 150
Hephaestos 65
Hera 12, 13, 196
Heracles 214
Heraclitus 209
Heraclitus, his logos 73, 131, 209, 233
Hercules 13, 150, 218, 242
Hermes 33, 71, 74, 75, 84, 86, 87, 90, 104, 109, 152, 175, 193, 197, 225, 226
Herodotus 13, 26, 32, 43, 44, 50, 51, 54, 55, 56, 59, 60, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 73, 74, 75, 76, 87, 97, 106, 109, 110, 112, 114, 129, 135, 150, 160, 170, 172, 174, 184, 185, 186, 187, 196, 197, 200, 218, 222, 231, 242, 246
Hesiod 3, 181
Hesus, Celtic god 37, 110, 139, 140, 266
Hippocrates, his tree 91, 216
Homer 22, 71, 128, 152, 170, 172, 174, 216
hymn 38, 39, 65, 85, 87, 131, 132, 133, 203, 246
Hyperboreans 13, 55, 135, 196, 244
Iacchus 43
Iaccus, or Sakya 43
Icarus, story of 4, 170
ichthus symbol, see Buddhist wheel 217
Ichthyophagi 186
Idanthyrsus, possbily being Ajatasatru 43, 63, 64
Iiiad 15
Ikshavaku 60
Indrakilla, sacrificial stake 23
inscription 57, 67, 68, 83, 84, 175, 178, 198, 239
Intaphernes 50
Iran 56, 62, 63, 67, 78, 92, 186, 244
Iraq 66, 204
Ireland 21, 51, 106, 223
Irenaeus 89, 114, 250
Isaiah 13, 25, 37, 40, 42, 91, 96, 98, 137, 151, 152, 154, 155, 158, 184, 225, 237, 240
Isis 182, 245, 247
isopsephy 101, 137, 226, 248
Israel 22, 25, 98, 99
Jains 3, 34, 43, 63, 64, 67, 143, 184, 203, 214, 217, 226
Jaluka, see Seleucid 52, 66, 160
Jambudvipa 55
Jancyrus 63
Jannaeus, Alexander; Hellenized Jewish king 70
Jarasandha 34, 68, 222
Jason 41, 75, 103, 181, 215, 220, 240, 270
Jataka 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 22, 30, 32, 36, 49, 50, 51, 54, 64, 67, 70, 91, 105, 112, 118, 124, 126, 128, 131, 135, 138, 141, 149, 152, 153, 154, 156, 157, 159, 160, 170, 172, 174, 178, 181, 188, 191, 192, 197, 198, 199, 210, 215, 216, 218, 220, 230, 231, 233, 236, 253, 255, 257, 258, 260, 264, 270
Javasakuna Jataka 7
Jaya-deva, Jehovah 52, 145
jayadeva, see Jehovah 52
Jayus, Zeus 52
jehovah 52
jeremiah 84, 98, 230, 234
Jerome, Saint 157, 168, 172
Jerusalem 11, 73, 74, 98, 111, 113, 170, 222, 225
jewels 39, 45, 108, 132, 253
jhelum 61
Jones, Sir William 6, 33, 34, 45, 57, 59, 76, 86, 145, 150, 169, 177, 184, 187, 242, 267
Josaphat, Bodhisattva 10, 28, 30, 33, 53, 69, 192, 203, 214
Joseph, variation of Bo-sat 10, 21, 22, 23, 27, 30, 62, 89, 98, 133, 137, 180, 197, 201, 230, 262, 271
Josephus 24, 62, 98, 114, 170, 172, 174, 180, 184, 187, 195
Jotham 96, 98, 99, 100, 170, 197, 245
jujube 54, 128, 160, 205, 245, 246
Julius Caesar 35, 71, 150
Junagadh, inscription of 198
Jupiter 139
kabbalah 182
kadambha, tree 182
kalos-kagathos 49
Kalyptos 56
kamboja, or Cambyses 55, 59, 60, 61, 180, 220
kambojas 12, 51, 56, 58, 59, 60, 181
kanha, Prakrit form of Krishna, or black 197, 200
Kanishka 4, 63, 101, 167, 239, 243, 249, 251, 256
Kapila 25, 178, 180, 187, 196
Kapilavastu 97, 178, 205, 222
karli 143, 247
karuna 58, 61, 118, 158
karunas 13, 176
kasaya, blood red color of the Buddhist robe 20, 95, 101, 183, 257
Kashmir 5, 24, 61, 67, 89, 119, 240
Kashyapa 66, 119
kathegetes, obscure technical term of the Greek philosophers and one of several such terms used by the allegedly Aramaic speaking Jesus 48, 115
Kersten, Holger; Theologian and author of the book Jesus lived in India 196, 219
Kleobis, & Biton 74
Kosala 24, 50
Krishna 5, 13, 14, 34, 112, 140, 156, 159, 160, 170, 181, 196, 197, 198, 200, 205, 266, 268
kshatriya 60, 64, 170, 195
Kubera 75, 96
Kunala Jataka 160, 198
Kurus, see Cyrus 34, 56, 61, 64, 67, 264
Lalitavistara 33, 38, 45, 50, 53, 59, 75, 86, 145, 152, 157, 165, 179, 192, 202, 256
Lankavatara Sutra 5, 115, 238
lao-tzu 205
Lazarus 6, 194
legion, Jesus's use of 42, 195
leprosy 18, 180, 194, 196
Libya 114, 175
Licchavi 12, 56, 190, 198, 238
Lindtner, Dr. Christian 4, 31, 47, 48, 83, 95, 96, 101, 133, 135, 152, 156, 164, 177, 191, 201, 216, 221, 228, 229, 238, 239, 246, 260, 265, 270
logos 4, 56, 80, 115, 176, 207, 209, 210, 221
Lokottaravadin, Buddhist school 154
lotus 3, 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 17, 38, 39, 48, 51, 59, 67, 75, 76, 78, 81, 83, 91, 95, 101, 105, 111, 113, 114, 115, 117, 118, 119, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 137, 138, 142, 147, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 157, 167, 182, 184, 186, 190, 199, 202, 208, 214, 215, 217, 222, 223, 228, 229, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 239, 246, 249, 250, 252, 253, 256, 257, 258, 261, 262, 264, 269, 270
lotus-eaters 135
lotus-eyed 160
lotus-eyes 250
lotuses 246
luke, Gospel of 14, 31, 47, 91, 117, 118, 119, 121, 122, 123, 125, 127, 128, 129, 131, 141, 159, 203, 204, 212, 257, 271
Lysimachus the Goth 194
Macedonian 169
Macedonians 214
madhyamaka 4
madras 165, 181
Maga, compared to the Magi 49, 66, 107, 205
Magadha 63, 64, 91, 97, 173, 222, 244, 264
Magadhan 34, 84
Magi 25, 27, 44, 49, 50, 54, 56, 62, 65, 66, 73, 76, 83, 84, 89, 90, 105, 198, 211, 229, 239, 244
magus 103, 105, 110, 111, 224
maha-corayita, or mahacora, "Great Thief", the etmons of Mercury 86
Mahabharata 140, 145, 198
Mahadeva 22, 74, 115, 125, 232
Mahajanaka Jataka, virgin birth 255
Mahakasyapa 23, 119, 121, 183, 193, 228, 259, 260, 267
Mahamaya 42, 137
Mahamoggallana 212, 266
Mahanama 54, 243
Mahaparinibbana sutta 36, 64, 91, 133, 134, 150, 165, 205, 206, 228, 234, 262, 269, 270
Mahasamghika, early Buddhist school 38, 201, 264
Mahasamghikas 153, 154, 233, 257
Mahasammata 204
Mahavagga 111
Mahavamsa 48, 103, 236
Mahavastu 91, 264
Mahavira 6, 43, 191, 203, 246
mahayanists 11, 29, 36, 39, 49, 74, 87, 115, 122, 137, 157, 191, 229, 233, 258, 264, 271
Mahosadha 9, 15, 54, 56, 86, 104, 112, 118, 131, 156, 178, 255, 259, 263, 270
Maitreya, a.k.a Messiah 5, 11, 12, 25, 26, 32, 33, 72, 76, 79, 111, 114, 138, 147, 149, 154, 180, 181, 183, 187, 190, 199, 207, 208, 216, 219, 222, 251, 258
Majjhima Nikaya 6, 66, 115
makara 27, 48
Mallas 50, 51
manages 6, 112
mandaean 101, 103
Mandaeans 101
mandala 11, 18, 34
mandalas 96, 101
Manetho 23, 24, 25, 175, 184, 185, 187, 188, 192, 242
mani-pearl 48
Manichaean 101, 123, 168, 170
Manichaeans 72, 121
Manichaeism 101, 225
Mara, Buddhist Satanl 42, 87, 124, 129, 136, 140, 149, 219, 258
Marcion 224
Marcosian 89
marigold 246
Mars 87
martyr 77, 155
martyrdoms 44
martyred 141, 267
martyrs 165, 254
Maurya 83, 91, 232
mausoleum 231
Maya 4, 14, 33, 42, 60, 64, 77, 81, 85, 96, 126, 145, 157, 158, 181, 185, 203, 229, 239, 245, 246, 256, 259
maypole 14
maypoles 14
Medes 62, 88, 181
medica, citrus 18
medicinal 83, 127, 240, 241, 246
medicinals 26
medicine 35, 83, 89, 95, 113, 128, 150, 183, 211, 220, 240, 241, 245, 263
medicines 220, 240, 241
Megasthenes 65, 71, 112, 168, 177, 210, 242
melibodes 43
Memphis 23, 24, 185, 186
Menander, Greco-Buddhist king 18, 48, 67, 74, 123, 176, 203, 224, 239, 245
Mendes, Egyptian god 26
merchant 50, 75, 87, 113, 118, 160, 236
merchants 23, 50, 67, 68, 75, 175
Mercury, also see mahocora 18, 33, 84, 85, 86, 87, 109, 113, 181, 184, 203, 226, 247
meroite 60, 177, 178
meroites 242
meroitic 242
Merv 165, 231
Mesopotamia 115
messiah 5, 11, 33, 115, 116, 125, 145, 173, 187, 199, 220
Metatron, a.k.a. Maitreya 33, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 181
Mexico 10
midrash 58
misra 25
Mithra 18, 25, 32, 35, 72, 108
Mithradates 56, 220, 246
Mithras 32, 33, 74, 149, 152, 204, 205, 222
mleccha 12, 202
mlecchai 12
mlecchas 12
monotheism 52, 184
monotrichous 123
moon 4, 9, 10, 11, 16, 32, 78, 84, 86, 185, 187, 207, 221, 224, 229
moon-hare 5
Moses 11, 15, 21, 23, 52, 54, 98, 114, 137, 144, 155, 156, 178, 181, 182, 189, 203, 207
mrcchakatika 6, 177, 187, 256
Mrcchakatika 90, 95, 138, 177, 187, 190, 191, 257
Mulasarvastivadins 6, 20, 167, 198, 224, 242, 257
Muller, Max 2, 5, 6, 27, 47, 62, 73, 76, 84, 97, 105, 107, 128, 135, 151, 154, 168, 169, 175, 194, 199, 250, 256, 259, 261, 265, 269
mustard, seeds 194, 235
myrobalan 12
myrrh 11, 129
Naasenes 114
naga 16, 39, 40, 43, 122, 131, 160, 178, 207, 232, 244, 247
Nagarjuna 3, 4, 5, 26, 38, 39, 40, 68, 69, 113, 120, 167, 219, 220, 240
nagas 29, 39, 40, 51, 69, 131, 196, 264
Nagasena 203
narayana 140, 221
Nasarenes 114
nastika, compared to gnostics 33
Natyacharya 150
Nazareth 114, 271
Nazirites 70
Nebuchadnezzar 51, 118
nelumbium, blue lotus 59
Nepal 14, 63, 240
Nicodemus, Gospel of 38, 202, 261
nirvana 46, 73, 132, 151, 154, 155, 159, 170, 193, 202, 209, 211, 216, 236, 253, 254, 259, 261, 266
non-being 73
non-duality 73
nr-papriya 89
nymphs 43, 181, 254
oak 14, 18, 19, 49, 88, 91, 93, 98, 139, 140, 170, 172, 174, 255, 266
oak-tree 18, 139
oaks 139, 266
Oanes 55, 56
obtained 41, 89, 121, 123, 185, 243
Oceanus 170, 172, 174
octagon 219
octagonal 18, 221, 229
odin 10, 11, 12, 14, 33, 36, 37, 52, 55, 71, 76, 84, 95, 97, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, 124, 139, 140, 160, 178, 191, 218, 226, 234, 254, 255
Odysseus 22
Odyssey 135
Ogia, giant 17
Ogugus 98
Ogyges, Okkaka 12, 88, 95, 98, 128, 170, 172, 173, 174, 182, 183, 185, 244
ogygia, Okkaka 175
Okkaka 11, 12, 28, 52, 61, 63, 90, 91, 95, 98, 139, 170, 172, 174, 175, 180, 182, 184, 197, 244
Okkakamukha 170, 172, 174
omega 178, 179
Ophir, Suparar 68, 159
opobalsamum, tree 89
Origen, Saint 75, 248
Orphites 43
Orus, Egyptian god 50
Osarseph 23
osiris 11, 43, 92, 150, 182, 185, 191
Ostanes 56, 65, 66
Ottorokorai, Sans. Uttara-kuru 181
pagoda 184
pahlavi 116, 149, 157
Paine, Thomas 7, 11, 21, 44, 45, 52, 58, 131
Pakistan 57, 67, 74, 214, 243
Palamedes 22
Palatine, hill 216, 242
Palestine 21, 47, 81, 84, 88, 96, 106, 113, 115, 149, 150, 153, 184
Pallas 242, 246
Pandareus, Greek god 205
pandera 45, 138, 195
Pandera 138, 156
Pandyas 242
Pantaenus, of Alexandria 227, 232
papyrus 17, 89, 177, 181, 187, 241, 247
parable 10, 11, 14, 30, 39, 47, 67, 73, 99, 115, 117, 122, 125, 127, 128, 129, 138, 157, 197, 232, 235, 241, 245, 249
parables 10, 67, 115, 117, 118, 128
Paracletes 115
paradise 95, 97, 101, 135, 166, 177, 208, 222, 235, 256
paradoxes 3, 209
paramitas 44, 253
pardons 50, 151, 156
parinibbana, fake death; Sans. parinirvana 155, 206, 218, 222
parinirvana 155, 259
parousia 243
parrot 89, 126, 128, 131, 157, 182
Parthians 95, 112, 227
Pasargad 87
pasenadi 22, 244
Patekus, father of Manes 72
pater 92
patriarchal 37, 93, 110, 262
Patrick, Saint 223
Paul 11, 45, 64, 136, 148, 149, 151, 158, 170, 177, 198, 209, 210, 217, 228, 229, 241
peisithanatos 144, 195
pelasgian 75
peloponnesus 170, 172, 174
penances 10, 118, 166, 229
pendera 156
pentagram 217
pepper 13, 14, 68, 175, 240
Persepolis 114, 205, 232
Perseushas 55
Persian 2, 16, 22, 25, 26, 30, 32, 33, 34, 35, 44, 48, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 60, 62, 63, 65, 76, 83, 84, 86, 88, 105, 112, 122, 135, 138, 149, 160, 170, 172, 174, 175, 176, 178, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 192, 195, 197, 198, 200, 204, 211, 218, 227, 231, 241, 243, 244, 246, 247, 256, 266
Peteseph, name of Joseph 21
phaedo 131, 210, 234, 268
phaleron 68
phallus 17, 108
Pharisees 54, 67, 195, 243, 244
philadelphus, son of Ptolemy Soter; compiled the bible and Asoka claims him as a convert 37, 65, 67, 70, 131, 133, 135, 144, 175, 176, 177, 184, 188, 195, 196, 198, 199, 207, 228, 232, 242, 246, 247
Philaretes, Alexandrian librarian who compiled Buddhist fables under the name Aisopeia 195
Philistines 21, 50, 244
phillip 6, 79, 98, 176, 184, 231
Philo 5, 71, 114, 115, 144, 146, 148, 176, 230
Philostratus 42, 128, 247, 248
phoenician 25, 72, 90, 97, 128, 145
phoenix 13, 17, 89, 128, 129, 131, 170, 178, 182, 189, 228
phuphl 43
Pindola 20, 42
pine, tree 181
pipal 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 37, 38, 43, 91, 95, 121, 139, 140, 155, 182, 189, 207, 260
pipal-arya 16, 88
pippalivana 91
pirated 5, 6, 71, 76, 118, 133, 191, 209, 215, 232, 247
pistachio 182
Pistis, Sophia 42, 132, 133, 134, 147, 181, 182, 247, 249, 250
plane, tree 216
plantanus, tree 216
Plato 3, 7, 22, 66, 67, 75, 121, 131, 135, 145, 149, 207, 210, 211, 216, 233, 234, 268
pleroma 11
Pliny 13, 35, 50, 70, 83, 128, 135, 150, 175, 198, 216, 248
plumeria, tree 155
Plutarch 10, 21, 34, 86, 176, 177, 179, 184, 185
Polyhistor, Alexander 66
pope 22, 154, 219, 227
poplar, tree. See pipal tree 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 37, 140, 141, 255
Porphyry 105, 168, 223
Portuguese 53, 178
Porus, king 62, 67, 173, 243, 253
Potiphar 22, 23, 180
Prabhutaratna, resurrected Buddha 114, 249
Prajnaparamita, sutra 10, 126, 203, 221, 245, 248
pramathas 45
Prasenajit, king 133
pratimoksa 78, 229
presbeutaes 147
Prometheus 45, 200, 220
Ptah, Egyptian god 23, 28, 65, 70, 76, 170, 172, 174, 185, 187, 247
Ptah-hotep 23
Ptah-sokar 23
ptolemaic 83, 175, 176, 184, 232, 258
Ptolemies 24, 65, 70, 75, 95, 137, 185, 195, 231
Pukkasati, Afghan Buddhist king, 500 B.C. 67
pun 37, 63, 95, 110, 188, 203, 206, 208, 235, 265
punning 86, 95
puns 86, 89, 90, 95, 147, 151, 190, 199, 200, 219, 224, 229, 265
Puphluns, Etruscan god 17
Purna, western Buddhist missionary 500 B.C. 55, 67, 68, 159, 214
puspavalivanarajikusumitabhidja, "flowering out of season" 95
Pyrrho 33, 67, 248
Pyrrhus 176, 266
Pythagoras 7, 66, 73, 131, 259
Pythagorean 78, 102, 142, 160, 217
Quatzacoatl 9
racism 170, 196, 200
racists 196
Rahula, Buddha's only son 39, 42, 44, 78, 121, 159, 212, 236
Ramayana 5, 170, 180, 182
Rampsinitus, story of compared to Jataka 87
Ratramnus, ancient Christian monk who points to Buddha/Jesus parallels 168
recitations 37, 110, 223
regenerating, see resurrection 129
relic-worship 44
relics 6, 12, 13, 17, 43, 59, 64, 66, 133, 134, 138, 176, 182, 229
resurrected 13, 34, 90, 114, 147, 160, 189, 257
resurrection 6, 114, 148, 194, 228, 238
Rhampsinitus, story of compared to a Jataka 32
rita 12
Rohin, river 170
Roman 10, 14, 15, 16, 21, 44, 47, 72, 84, 107, 108, 132, 150, 152, 156, 158, 166, 167, 195, 214, 227, 228, 240, 247
Romans 18, 26, 63, 73, 85, 109, 150, 175, 195, 196, 198, 199, 203, 213, 214, 231, 254
rooster 17, 218
rosaries 10, 166
rose 43, 87, 181, 246, 267
Rosetta, Stone 70, 137, 175
rowanm tree 20
Rudradamanm inscriptions of 198
rukh, chess piece 33
Rukmavati Avadana 253
sa treel 88, 95, 96, 182, 259
Sabians 101
sac 70, 89
sackcloth 50, 70
sacrifice 26, 32, 35, 46, 71, 91, 109, 140, 143, 157, 184, 200, 208, 220, 253, 260
sacrificed 5, 109, 189, 217
sacrifices 9, 35, 78, 116, 166, 208, 220
sacrificial 25, 26, 32, 37, 109, 114, 143, 146, 178, 185, 201, 215, 216, 221, 243
sacrificing 5
Sadducees 67, 68, 69
Sakadwippa 109
Sakae 12, 13, 62, 63, 111, 112, 168, 195, 196
Sakaes, see Scythian 181, 196, 208
Sakastan 60, 112, 179
Sakayauvatish, location of Gomata's death 56
Sakra, or Sakka 13, 22, 58, 123, 197, 202, 203, 249, 256
Sakya, variation of Godama's clan name Shakya 43, 55, 62, 63, 70, 87, 89, 90, 91, 92, 95, 97, 112, 157, 170, 172, 174, 180, 185, 197, 205, 262
Sakya-Buddha 37, 56, 110
sakyamuni 26, 37, 39, 54, 56, 91, 110, 147, 249, 255, 257
sakyamunis 62, 63, 115
Salmoxis 259
salt 25, 207, 211, 212
saltiness 211, 212
samadhi 4, 131, 205, 232, 236
saman 107, 121
samana Prakrit form of Sramana 16, 21, 78, 102, 111, 121, 176, 187, 244
Samanaeans 104, 110, 111
Samantabhadra 118, 120, 260
samaritan 91, 164
samdha-bhasa, esoteric, or secret, Buddhism 269
Samghabhedavastu 32, 159, 181, 187
Samothracians 75
Samuel 11, 21, 53, 164
Sanchuniathon 98
sandals 210, 229
sangha 12, 37, 66, 71, 75, 109, 110, 111, 128, 151, 203, 216, 221, 223, 257, 271
Sangrila, an ancient Shangri-la 218
sapphire, being from Ophir, or, Supara 68
Saracen, birth place of Scythianus 74
Sargon, compared to Okkaka 51, 170
Sariputra 5, 49, 71, 205, 219, 265, 269
Sases 123, 239, 242
Satan 10, 42, 45, 87, 92, 119, 137, 197, 202, 219, 225, 258
satipatthana 206
satire 147, 158, 207, 224
Saxons 53, 107
schism 67, 91, 131, 148, 182, 232, 269, 271
schisms 67, 261
Scholasticus 113
scrolls 36, 155, 157, 170, 175, 231
Scythians 26, 37, 54, 62, 64, 76, 83, 86, 96, 109, 110, 111, 112, 135, 150, 168, 170, 172, 174, 195, 196, 198, 200, 220, 227, 230, 242, 243, 262, 263
Scythianus, Alexandrian teacher of Buddas 28, 72, 73, 74, 75, 77, 80, 81, 95, 101, 102, 103, 104, 111, 113, 115, 123, 126, 138, 142, 148, 153, 195, 209, 225, 233
Scythopolis 195
Sebastian 192
see jayas 13, 18, 41, 43, 52, 55, 70, 85, 139, 140, 149, 173, 177, 196, 266
see sacrificial stake 23, 114, 215, 216, 217, 219
Seleucid 67, 160, 195, 204
Seleucus 52, 66, 204
Septuagint,translated and compiled under request of Philadelphus 10, 21, 48, 62, 96, 155, 170, 244
Serapis 144, 145, 149, 150, 152, 175, 184, 185, 208, 240, 246
serpent 16, 68
Sesac 180
Sesostris 160
Seth 17, 30, 85, 92, 181, 182, 184, 185, 187
seven-headed dragon 40, 41
seventy-two, unique number 123, 228, 229
Sextus, on the snake as a rope 69
Shakespeare 7
shaman 16, 21, 177, 210
Shambala 135
Shechem, biblical town 90, 91, 93, 97, 98, 99, 100
Shiva 185
showbread 244
Shurangama Sutra, translated during the Tang Dynasty by Sramana Paramiti 3, 42, 74, 77, 118, 130, 141, 152, 213, 214, 219, 221, 223, 233, 236, 238, 250, 258, 268
sindon, NT word for Indian shroud of Jesus 255
single-eye 206
single-mindedness 205
Sinuhe, Tale of 91
Sirach, Jesus Ben 10, 81
sirens 128, 192
skepticos 33
slavery 46, 52, 144, 178, 242, 243, 271
Slavs 196
Sogdian 123, 149
Sognedal, tree of 20
Solomon, as a Sramana representative 68, 154, 222, 230
solstice 108
Sophists 67, 115, 144, 148, 167, 177, 256
sour-milk 34
sparangoo, see swaddled 203
Spartembas 59
spear 140, 160, 182, 216, 238, 269
spikenard, NT word for Indian ointment 129, 240
Srabha-miga-jataka 124
sramana, sramanas & sramanes 21, 75, 86, 102, 111, 152, 177, 210, 223, 253, 265
staff 14, 43, 71, 84, 89, 95, 183, 229, 259
stake, sacrificial; also see Indrakila 6, 23, 138, 141, 148, 155, 195, 216, 221, 243
star 18, 110, 217, 219, 229, 231
Stephen, Saint 77
Strabo 3, 12, 17, 27, 63, 150, 180, 240
stupa 42, 58, 59, 64, 66, 71, 114, 138, 152, 159, 208, 216, 217, 218, 223, 228, 231
Subhuti 60, 122
Suddhodana 54, 205
sudra 187, 197
Sudraka, king 187
Sudras 91
suffering 20, 37, 70, 73, 76, 101, 154, 155, 183, 193, 207, 217, 223, 225, 237, 253
sufferings 118, 122, 132, 141, 154, 159
Suidas 10, 138
suitors 51
sukaramaddava 77, 86, 241
suken-mian, Jesus's pun on one-fig/Sakyamuni made known by Dr. Lindtner 17, 89
sukkot 36, 236
Sumedha Jataka 105, 141, 149, 152, 153, 199, 202, 210, 236, 249, 253, 257
sun 9, 11, 12, 26, 27, 30, 37, 42, 58, 63, 66, 76, 83, 84, 86, 89, 97, 105, 108, 110, 112, 116, 126, 127, 128, 137, 145, 149, 170, 174, 178, 180, 182, 185, 207, 208, 219, 221, 222, 224, 249
Sunga, Empire 64
Supara, see Ophir 68
super-market, Of Buddha & Mercury 87
Suprabuddha 59
supremacists 196
Surangamasamadhisutra, E. Lamotte 183, 235, 236, 237
Susa 186
susana 200, 203
susanna 90
swaddled 70, 202, 203
swaddling 203
swallowed 258
sycamine tree 91
sycamore 91
Sydracae, Sans. Sudraka 187
Sylvanae, being a grove of sal trees 96
synchronism 51, 157, 184, 245
Tacitus 107
talmud 14, 28, 29, 52, 138, 145, 156
tamarind 90, 192
tamarisk 139
Tamil 12, 31, 65, 165, 242
tanha 234
tao, principle of 56, 73, 213
Taoist 13, 129, 153
tar-baby 27
tattoo 258
taxation 49
taxes 34, 49, 51, 60, 103, 159, 178, 205
Taxila 58, 59, 67, 198, 204, 231, 240, 243
teak, tree 95
tekton 215, 240
Tell-Balata 91
tere-binthus 87
tere-butm 147
terebinth, as the butm tree 83, 87, 88, 89, 91, 96, 97, 102, 138, 139, 182, 216, 235, 239, 246
terebinths 93, 96, 139
Terebinthus, a.k.a. Buddas 29, 72, 77, 81, 83, 84, 95, 97, 101, 102, 103, 111, 113, 114, 116, 117, 137, 147, 153, 168, 182, 225, 265
Terminthos, poss. a corrupted form of Terebinthus 83
theon, acc. of theos 210
theos, also see jaya 41, 52, 173, 175, 176
Theosophists 4, 260
Therapeutae 144, 146, 147, 150, 176, 269
Thomas 7, 10, 11, 21, 31, 39, 44, 45, 52, 58, 75, 95, 117, 122, 123, 125, 131, 132, 133, 138, 164, 165, 167, 168, 181, 209, 212, 215, 218, 226, 227, 230, 232, 233, 235, 238, 239, 242, 243, 245, 256, 257, 258, 259, 266, 267, 268, 271
thread, sacred 20, 112
Thundy, Zacharias P. 3, 6, 47, 90, 114, 145, 146, 177, 190, 246
Tibet 11, 43, 51, 60, 102, 166, 167, 175
Tibetan 10, 11, 55, 86, 116, 123, 140, 186, 193, 208, 217, 221, 226, 241
Timaeus, by Plato 211
Timbuktu 97
time-tree 218
Tissa 22
tongues 13, 105, 209
tonic 19, 150
tonsure 217
torch-bearer 32
touchstone 85, 90
towers 51, 256
transfiguration 134
trees 14, 17, 18, 19, 36, 38, 40, 49, 64, 89, 90, 91, 95, 96, 97, 99, 101, 108, 127, 135, 139, 155, 170, 178, 180, 181, 182, 189, 192, 197, 200, 210, 218, 229, 235, 256, 259, 266
trefoil 141, 217
Trema, nettle tree 155
trident 3, 71
triratnas, Buddhist trinity 217
Turan 62, 63
Turkey 41, 88, 170, 172, 174, 219
turpentine 81, 83, 88, 95
turtledove 72
twice-born 43
Tyche-agathos 213
typhon 182
udumbaras, parasitic Buddhist tree 95, 128, 180, 189, 229
Ullambana Sutra 223
Upadarma 57
Upagupta 42, 120, 159, 198, 236
Upanishads 140, 205
Uppsala, tree of 95
Uranus 3, 181
usnisa 216
vagrant 247
Vairocana, see Veronica 21, 75, 120
Vajjis 51
Valentinus 17, 103, 144, 224
Varuna 80
Vasubandhu 265
Vates , Celtic/Roman god 16, 71, 250, 266
vatica robusta 96
Vatican 16, 17, 41
Vessantara Jataka 215
Vidudabha 51, 64, 67, 96, 180, 187, 243, 244
Vimalakirti Sutra 29, 30, 121, 122, 125, 190, 210, 233, 235, 236, 238, 253, 258, 261
vinaya 4, 6, 26, 35, 49, 83, 112, 117, 129, 150, 187, 201, 203, 224, 228, 242, 257, 271
Virgil 33, 77, 103
virgin-birth 157
Visakha Jataka 50, 181
voodoo 10
Votan 16
Wadjet 247
war-chariot 35, 188
Wednesday 84, 109
White-Horse temple 257
world-tree 218
Xavier b Saint Francis 50
Xenophon 58, 131
xenos 40
Xerxes 35, 57
Yadava 68
Yadu 51, 63, 196
Yahweh, see Jayadeva 219
Yajurveda 240
yajus 71, 143
yama 65, 84, 180, 182, 202, 209
yata-giya-devasa, being "once upon a time" 231
Yavanajataka 198
yeast 41, 181
Yehuda, Ben Eliezer 114
Yeshu, Ben Pandera 29, 45
yggdrasil 140
yoghurt 88
yogis 205
Yu-chi 113
Zadok 68, 69
Zagreus 189
zak, teak tree 95, 128
Zaleucus 160
Zaranes, associated with Buddas 225
zen 43
Zend, Avesta 35, 58, 265
zero, first use of 33, 226
Zeus-dios 52
Zoroaster 56, 65, 115, 149, 157, 158, 168, 179, 186, 231, 256
Zoroastrian 12, 32, 35, 65, 91, 149, 157, 219, 225, 232




The figures below I believe to be of a Eu-Phratean, or Su-Bharat’n (Sumeru/Sineru priest), a Sphinx-like Hun,a Persian Satrap, an Indian courtesan compared to Ambapali & Ροδωπις, Sakae with Liberty-cap, a sramana styled as Sakyamuni (later robe of Isis/Therapeutae). Basically we have all the figures for the Amasis Cinderella, or candala-LA (sudra, or suda) story known so well in Buddhist lands. The reader familiar with Scythianus’ favorite wife, as told by early church fathers, and the Greek philosophers handling of the Cinderella legend, though in different forms, and the royal Indian marriages after the time of Buddha, will also see allegory preserved quite well in the Bride of Christ. In my monograph I also discuss the Buddhist origin to the Beauty and the Beast, Snow White, Lion-King, and many other influential fables.

These figures were discovered at the Ptah temple in Memphis by Flinders Petrie. Scholars barely consider the Tibetan, Hun and other Central Asian figures to have been influential or to have played a part in forming the larger cultures.
The Levites are appointed as therapeutai of God, understood allegorically as reason" Jewish Women Philosophers of First-Century Alexandria, p. 59 Sans. ‘bodhi’ , the “reasoning” by which one “knows”, Grk. gnos, or nous, or Sans. -nas. My monograph also reveal the Gnostic use of ‘binth’ includes the meanings of ‘reasoning’, and ‘suffering’ (Grk penthos/pathos)
Like ‘TA’, the TAU cross of Kanishka, the TAO,or ‘reasoning’, of TE CHING ('The Sunaga'), the ‘NA’ represents Buddha, or a jewel, or emptiness, the Egyptian God Shu (s = t) .


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:39 am 
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Apollo
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 2:02 am
Posts: 351
Location: Bharathavarsham
Dan,

Peacock in Sans is Mayura and not Maurya, which are totally unrelated words although they may look related when written in English due to interchanging the position of a couple of letters. Maurya derives from the word Mura, the supposed mother of Chandragupta.

DanielHopkins wrote:
Some connect the Mauryas to the warrior class, who the Buddhist texts say have mixed also with sudras, their names appear from Taxila to Merv and from east of the Black Sea down through Scythopolis to Egypt, this was the top half of the east/west trade route. A theorized connection to the Mauryas can be made to the Indian peacock (Sans. “maurya,” or “zikhin”), which was in Greece with the Buddhists 500 B.C. and fascinated Alexander the Great. Given the Brahmin myth that Sudras were essentially born from the feet of Brahma and Epiphanius’s words on the peacock: “When he sees his feet, he screams wildly, thinking that they are not in keeping with the rest of his body.” Although it may just be a poetic interpretation of symbolism, the Buddhist peacock may represent their rewriting the myth that sudras were the feet of the divine man, that everyone has to get their feet ruffed up a little

_________________
Janani Janmabhoomishcha Swargadapi Gareeyasi - Being near to your mother in your motherland is better than being in paradise

Ekavarnam yatha dugdham binnavarnasu dhenushu | tataiva dharmavaichitryam tatvam ekam param smritam ||
Just as milk is of only one colour though obtained from cows of different colours so also the peculiarities of different religious thoughts lead to the same one ultimate truth - Mahabharatha


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:00 am 
Hey Balu,

Thanks for the possible correction.

You say that they are totally unrelated words; all words in a language are related and "etymologies" are only a starting point, not a true "origin". You wrote "Maurya derives from the word Mura.." As morakkha is distorted fr. *mauryaka, patronymic of mura, what word do YOU derive "mura" from?

The Buddhists themselves made the association and they were not going from English, or probably, any other script. Someone who follows Buddha may be a Bauddha, as they imagined a Mora, or, Mura may be a Maurya.


"Following Alexander's death, the peacock acquired religious importance among the Ptolemies. In the grand procession of Ptolemy II Philadelphus in 275-274 B.C., the colorful birds were paraded in cages and may have been worshiped, perhaps dedicated to Zeus. Alexander's association with peacocks, Dionysus, and India, and Mariette's discovery of peacock statues adjacent to the Philosophers Circle at Saqqara, suggested that an important tomb was nearby, presumable of Greco-Macedonian origin. Alexander is the only obvious candidate." Alexander's Tomb: The Two Thousand Year Obsession to Find the Lost Conqueror, p. 161


"Now the determinative for the word tekh, a weight, is the sign for "heart," and we know that the bird called tekh or tekhnu, which closely resembled the ibis, the bird sacred to Thoth, was in the opinion of some ancient writers connected with the heart" The Gods of the Egyptians: p 402

"This title is also likely to have been a pun derived from a similar Egyptian word tekh, meaning 'bread and wine mixed together”

"In connexion with Sekhet and her relationship with Hathor, Net, and Maat must be mentioned the Seven Wise Ones of the goddess Meh-urt, who together with Thoth, TEKH, planned the world {carpenter 'taksa'); they were born of Meh-urt at the feet of Nu.. and they took the form of seven hawks and flew upwards, and together with Asten, a form of Thoth, they presided over learnin and letters,. The names of these Seven Wise Ones are Nefer-hati, Aper-pehui, Neb-Tsheru, Ka, Bak, Khekh, and San. Ptah, as the master architect and workman who carried out the designs of Thoth and his Seven Wise Ones, partook, in some respects ,of the characteristics of them all"
Thoth-Ibis bird-moon (Chandra).


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:56 am 
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Apollo
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It is a Good Question , if one assumes that Mura itself is not a corrupted word of Sans origin. Mura in Sanskrit stands variously for ego, ignorance or one that remains hidden. Mura is also the name of an Asura destroyed by Krishna. (Hence the name Murari to Krishna). Deriving Maurya from Mura is in accordance with rule of regular Sanskrit Samasa and it is in the same ratio as saying that a follower of Buddha is a Baudha or that a son of Kunti is a Kaunteya.

But if Mura is a corrupted word of Sans origin, then I have no idea what its etymology could be. Mayura becomes More in Hindi, Mayil in Tamil and Navil in Kannada with all three languages also retaining the original Mayur in their day to day vocabulary. It is possible Mura is a peacock in some other northern prakritik language of which I am not aware.


DanielHopkins wrote:
Hey Balu,

Thanks for the possible correction.

You say that they are totally unrelated words; all words in a language are related and "etymologies" are only a starting point, not a true "origin". You wrote "Maurya derives from the word Mura.." As morakkha is distorted fr. *mauryaka, patronymic of mura, what word do YOU derive "mura" from?

The Buddhists themselves made the association and they were not going from English, or probably, any other script. Someone who follows Buddha may be a Bauddha, as they imagined a Mora, or, Mura may be a Maurya.


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Janani Janmabhoomishcha Swargadapi Gareeyasi - Being near to your mother in your motherland is better than being in paradise

Ekavarnam yatha dugdham binnavarnasu dhenushu | tataiva dharmavaichitryam tatvam ekam param smritam ||
Just as milk is of only one colour though obtained from cows of different colours so also the peculiarities of different religious thoughts lead to the same one ultimate truth - Mahabharatha


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 11:10 pm 
Balu,

I agree that it is a good question.

You wrote "Mura in Sanskrit stands variously for ego, ignorance or one that remains hidden". I see mra, lord, ego, etc. with the Buddhists I also see maya equaling mara, I also consider Mayil to have been Maurya. and gupta (geptu/copt), besides meaning hidden, was another Buddhist vox-mystika of which a single intended etymology may not be too relevant or even possible?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 8:06 am 
Sanacharib {rabbi-Sunaga, Amasis II), king of the Arabians and Assyrians, marched his vast army into Egypt, the warriors one and all refused to come to his (i.e., the Pharaoh Sethos) aid. On this the monarch, greatly distressed, entered into the inner sanctuary, and, before the image of the god, bewailed the fate which impended over him. As he wept he fell asleep, and dreamed that the god came and stood at his side, bidding him be of good cheer, and go boldly forth to meet the Arabian host, which would do him no hurt, as he himself would send those who should help him. Sethos, then, relying on the dream, collected such of the Egyptians as were willing to follow him, who were none of them warriors, but traders, artisans, and market people; and with these marched to Pelusium, which commands the entrance into Egypt, and there pitched his camp. As the two armies lay here opposite one another, there came in the night, a multitude of field-mice, which devoured all the quivers and bowstrings of the enemy, and ate the thongs by which they managed their shields.





The Buddha would often say that an imposter who approaches Buddha would soon have his head split into seven via lightning sent from the gods. The Greek gods, like other gods, also may strike down a heretic, although curiously those who were actually struck by lightning, according to several ancient writers, were viewed as being almost human representations of a particular god. The Aztec dragon Xiuhcoatl also guards divine knowledge and is said to battle those of the underworld. The good doctor Jason drugged the dragon guarding the Golden Fleece, which many believe was obtained from a Himalayan creature. Like the legend around Joshua and his mission on the Amalekites, the first mention of Jason and the Argonauts appears at the founding of the Egyptian Alexandria.
"When field -mice do injury to the crop the owner goes to a Syana, or cunning man, who writes a charm, the letters of which he dissolves in water and scatters it over the plants. The ancient Greek farmer was recommended to proceed as follows: "Take a sheet of paper and write on it these words, ‘Ye mice here present, I adjure ye that ye injure me not, neither suffer another mouse to injure me. I give you yonder field, but if ever I catch you here again, by the help of the Mother of the gods, I will rend you in seven pieces.'" The popular religion and folk-lore of northern India, Volume 2, p. 301

“And the dragon stood on the shore of the sea. And I saw a beast coming out of the sea. He had ten horns and seven heads, with ten crowns on his horns, and on each head a blasphemous name.”―Rev, 13:1.

By some, it is believed that the number seven symbolizes the seven mounds of the Vatican, or Vate’s seven hills. There were also seven hills to Constantine’s Wall in Turkey. The seven-headed dragon Lotan appears before Christianity and Saint John’s associating the number seven with the planets is well known. The Indians also had seven sages, not to be confused with the seven sages that are said to live until the end of the age (chiranjivi), that were probably also representative of the seven stars (planets) and mention is made here of the Buddhist grouping of seven Buddhas before Godama in the very early Mahapadana sutta; in art, they are often represented by their stupa, or mound, later they turn into the twenty-four Buddhas. The prominent Buddhists all reside on their mountain peak; Buddha’s is Vulture’s Peak, Upagupta, Pindola, etc..., all reside at the mountain top. Most “Gnostics” also claim seven prophets, and some Muslim sects claim seven prophets ending with the Mahdi.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:27 am 
Homer's Cyrene Sirens, the female Buddhist Charyas of Battus

When the noble Avalokiteçvara had (thus) in many ways profited living beings, he assumed, in order to give an example of how to choose virtue and to reject sin (according to the Sutra Za-ma-tog), the form of the horse king Bhalaha[Maitreya] to work (further) for the good of the living beings. At this time many merchants from the South of India, whose merits were but small, had departed to the outer ocean to search for jewels. With the many implements each one wanted they had gone on board a large vessel, (but) after the expiration of seven days they were brought into danger by an unwelcome wind, thus:[2] "At midday a dark cloud like a dense fog obscures the light of the sun and spreads darkness (everywhere); a fearful red wind seems to shake the foundations of the earth, (so that) the mighty trees of the forest fall. The waves of the sea spring like lions, and the breakers lash sky and earth. The merchants take hold of each other, and calling (loud) on the names of their relatives, they cry; howling in terrified lamentation, they weep, helpless and exhausted, bloody tears, nevertheless the vessel goes to wreck." Then the merchants take firm hold of some beam[3] of the wrecked ship, and, driven in one direction by an unwelcome wind, they were carried to the island of Si"nghala (sic!), which was (a dwelling-place) of Râkshasîs. There the merchants, calling each other by name, came on shore (lit. the dry, viz. land). When the Râkshasîs became aware of this, they changed themselves into young and exceedingly pretty women, and.. (see Jesus's Godama Sources)



Also, it is mentioned here that the Lotus sutra word for “lotus,” ”pundarika,” can also mean, “a bird”; “bird” being named from the mystical poets/singers, or “Bards” which can be compared to Homer’s Sirens that tempt sailors, just as the demon temptress in a well-known Jataka (Valahasa) lures sailors to their doom who are not saved by the Bodhisattva in the form of a “white horse.” Scholars consider Philostratus’ account to reference the Indian Garuda. The name phoenix is said to be from the same word that formed Phoenician, and it is also a name for the red date, because the famed “Lotus eaters” were said to eat the Jujube fruit, which is revered today by Christians and Muslims as the tree which produce Jesus thorn relic (Cox’s Sun Worship, V. II, p. 120). It may be that those who first wrote The Phoenix were referencing the Jujube red date tree (Jujube, or Badara, an important Buddhist medicine, though they were not eaten, like the udumbaras figs, to protect the seeds) of India, and there is an old Sanskrit word describing the sharp thorns of this tree (vakrakanta). This poem, The Phoenix, is thought to derive from three western sources but Muller’s parallels show that the Lotus parallels are littered throughout the work. The oldest MSS is Anglo and is believed to have been from a Saxon copy derived from the Latin writing Christian poet Lactantius, whose teacher, Arnobius, was “Gnostic” and held the creator of this world as evil (because he causes us to die, i.e. Mara). Arnobius mentions the Indians and Seres (Chinese) contribution to religion, his Lotus teaching is also seen in his book directly before he mentions the religious contribution of India and China. Arnobius wrote, “His [God’s] virtues and powers have been made manifest to you, and that unheard-of power over things, whether that which was openly exercised by him..., He has subdued the fire of passion, and causes races, and peoples, and nations, most diverse in character to hasten with one accord (eka-yana).”―Seven books of Arnobius against Gentiles, p. 76. His student, Lactantius, borrows the fabled speech of, and argues against, Hellenism, while trying to unify his readers poetically into Christianity, or his “One-Vehicle” which is the Lotus sutra’s tactical goal (the eka-yana and the earlier eka-gotra, or the “one-race” preached by Jesus and first Buddha). As it was west, so did the far east have the Lotus sutra for around 400 years by the time we get to figures like Augustine and Lactantius. Although disguised in semi Taoist and Confucian terminology, a similar mode of borrowing, criticizing, and attempted unification, occurs in China by the followers of the Lotus sutra as was seen in Christianity. Besides being more didactic and categorized, the main difference being that the Chinese Buddhist canon, including the liturgical hymns and commentaries, greatly outweighed all Christian literature of the same time.


Several Ghandara edicts of Asoka use the word “eusebia” to translate “dharma” which was used in the sense of “righteous conduct,” Jesus uses the same word with the same meaning in the earliest Greek gospels. That the Buddhist sense of “dharma” was followed by the Greek philosophers is shown by their anthropomorphizing the concept of “Eusebia” as “Daimon,” who were first the Buddhist Bodhisattvas. The Augustan Romans also used the Greek word for dharma in their honorific title Sebastos, which some have speculated is from the Sanskrit “siva” or “saba,” but in light of the Christian and Greek dharma concept of eusabia it may be considered that the word derives from the Buddhist “saha-stha,” or “standing [firmly] in this world of suffering,” however the more direct borrowing appears to be from the Pali word “sabaseta,” or “the best breed,” a word applied to the Bodhisattva in the Jataka where he saves his listeners, in the form of a white horse flying through the air, from the Sirens, or Gandharvas which the author of the Revelation of Saint John clearly references in Rev. 19:17-18. Another form of this word is “Sevayash,” which is the name of a Persian king whose legend has parallels with Buddha. The Book of Sothis, thought to be another forgery from Manetho, gives Ptolemy Philadelphus the title “Sebastos,” the Buddhist “Sahastha.” This also calls to mind “savayana,” a name for the Buddha’s funeral chariot, which has given its name to a town in Bihar where it is said the Buddha’s chariot holding his remains rested for several days. Later this same word would be back-formed into Sanskrit as the word “Zrisavayana” which is said to describe a part of the Romana Siddhanta, or “[a certain] Roman doctrine.” As Smerdis the usurper may have been a Persian, or Sakyan, Buddhist, and as this name may be from the Buddhist “smrti,” which, in a Buddhist sense, is closely related to “dharma,” this may be, like the Latin name Sebastian...


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:35 am 
See: VALÂHASSA JÂTAKA

Homer = Sanskrit 'amara' -"immortal"; said of the gods and the # 33, the Indian gods, compared to the 33 Homeric hymns to the gods.

The first century Roman historian Pliny the Elder discounted Sirens as pure fable, "although Dinon, the father of Clearchus, a celebrated writer, asserts that they exist in India, and that they charm men by their song, and, having first lulled them to sleep, tear them to pieces.


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